Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani

2: How an Esports Gamer managed to raise funding multiple times with Charles Meaden

July 23, 2020 Sam Kamani
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
2: How an Esports Gamer managed to raise funding multiple times with Charles Meaden
Chapters
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
2: How an Esports Gamer managed to raise funding multiple times with Charles Meaden
Jul 23, 2020
Sam Kamani

In this episode I interview Charlie Meaden, who started his entrepreneurship journey as a Professional Esports Gamer. Today his latest startup Gembot is on a mission to democratize investment tools.

🇬🇧 Charlie is originally from the UK, however he is now based in New Zealand and has managed to raise funding multiple times from Angel investors and funds.

He has both worked for and founded multiple startups.

Charlie shares candidly in this episode why he has been successful in raising money. He also gives us an insight into how angel investors and founders think.

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

If you can find out more about Charlie or connect with him here👇

https://gembot.ai/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/charles-meaden-346375116/
https://twitter.com/uproarcharlie?lang=en

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode I interview Charlie Meaden, who started his entrepreneurship journey as a Professional Esports Gamer. Today his latest startup Gembot is on a mission to democratize investment tools.

🇬🇧 Charlie is originally from the UK, however he is now based in New Zealand and has managed to raise funding multiple times from Angel investors and funds.

He has both worked for and founded multiple startups.

Charlie shares candidly in this episode why he has been successful in raising money. He also gives us an insight into how angel investors and founders think.

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

If you can find out more about Charlie or connect with him here👇

https://gembot.ai/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/charles-meaden-346375116/
https://twitter.com/uproarcharlie?lang=en

[00:00:00] Charlie Meaden: [00:00:00] Yeah. And I didn't care about going to coffee, you know, like, and getting a coffee with them.

[00:00:05] Cause I don't want coffee really. They don't want to waste half an hour of their time with small talk. Yeah. you know, I think for you want to make a really good first impression and build a rapport, so they want to hang out with you again. Yeah. 

[00:00:19] Well that's with anyone that's when you're recruiting.

[00:00:21] Yeah. that's when you're finding a partner in life, you know? Yeah. You just. Yeah. So anyway, built relationship with a few key players in the investment scene and they helped me drive the round over the line and raise the first capital.

[00:00:37] Sam Kamani: [00:00:37] This podcast is for founders and entrepreneurs and dreamers. Like you. I want you to be able to learn from the stories of other founders and investors on what money got money with Sam Kemani entrepreneurs from all around the world, come and share their stories. What made them successful, what mistakes they could have avoided.

[00:00:58] The goal of this [00:01:00] podcast is to provide you with a shortcut to success.

[00:01:03] So today, We have Charlie Meaden here with us on the show. He is a serial entrepreneur. He has had multiple startups that he has started and he has done funding rounds at least three or four times that I'm aware of.

[00:01:19] But today he will tell a bit more about his journey. He shared about how he. went out and managed to raise money. so many times, and currently he is the CEO and co founder of Gembot. So Gembot is a AI FinTech startup. So why don't we just hear from Charlie, Charlie is great to have you here on the show.

[00:01:41] Great to be here. yeah. so at the moment, what I'm working on is a systematic, investment platform and fund. Yeah. which just focuses on AI. but from an augmented kind of lens. So we're using machine learning and AI blended [00:02:00] with, human interaction, to basically get better gains from, the stock market.

[00:02:06] Yep. 

[00:02:07] So, yeah. So how did you get started on your intrepreneurship journey? What was your, Is that a first project or what was the first thing you did? 

[00:02:17] Charlie Meaden: [00:02:17] I kind of, I did a few things. I started off kind of being an avid pro gamer yeah. Where I spent a lot of time playing video games, competitively. And that was really fun.

[00:02:29] I learned a lot through that whole period, even about business. Yeah. And, I kind of stumbled into the, jewelry, manufacturing business. So I, trained as a Goldsmith and then, couple, couple years down the line, I started my own manufacturing business. Yeah. And that was the start into entrepreneurship and a kind of creating my own businesses.

[00:02:50]yeah, that 

[00:02:50] Sam Kamani: [00:02:50] was, that is a massive step to just go out and faith and, you know, start a business on your own, which pretty much I know a lot of people [00:03:00] who procrastinate for so many years. I don't know why, what gave you the courage to, 

[00:03:06] Charlie Meaden: [00:03:06] yeah, I was quite young and I didn't really know what, I didn't know. I think interestingly, you know, sometimes when you're a little bit younger, you're a little bit more naive to the consequences.

[00:03:18] Yeah. 

[00:03:18] Sam Kamani: [00:03:18] but in general, I 

[00:03:20] Charlie Meaden: [00:03:20] had a good I'd built up through employment. I had built up a reasonable network. And I felt like I could actually learn a lot more and well, I could earn as much as I was earning. At least I was kind of thinking worst case scenario. I'm going to earn as much as I am earning currently, but I'm going to put in half the hours.

[00:03:38] Sam Kamani: [00:03:38] Yeah. 

[00:03:40] Charlie Meaden: [00:03:40] Which meant I could, you know, pursue pro gaming. Then when I started getting it's attack and right. Learning to code and getting into kind of startups, it gave me that freedom to. To also explore them and do that. So, yeah. So yeah, I mean, for me it was, I had some money saved. I bought fill [00:04:00] up a bit of Goodwill with a bunch of, my network and yeah.

[00:04:04] I just decided to do it really. And I kind of built it out with my previous employer that I would contract to them on a per piece basis. Yeah. So it's was still, essentially, they were still doing some of my lead generation and bringing me work. 

[00:04:19] Sam Kamani: [00:04:19] Oh, that's pretty cool. 

[00:04:21] Charlie Meaden: [00:04:21] Which was cool. but, but I was getting paid per piece rather than per hour.

[00:04:25] Yeah. So all I knew was this, as long as I became more efficient, I would make more money.

[00:04:31]Sam Kamani: [00:04:31] did you raise it? Is there any money for your first 

[00:04:33] Charlie Meaden: [00:04:33] venture? No, the first venture was actually, it was the opposite. It was the, it was a cashflow machine. Yeah. it was all, it was all really margin actually. that's pretty cool. It was highly profitable to the jewelry industry is insanely profitable.

[00:04:49] Yeah. you know, your margins are anywhere between kind of couple hundred percent to thousands of percent. Wow. yeah, it was low expenses cause I had par like I had built relationships [00:05:00] with people and kind of rented hot desks, almost their facilities. and then, yeah. Yeah. 

[00:05:06] Sam Kamani: [00:05:06] That's probably why you had such, favorable margins.

[00:05:10] No overheads, 

[00:05:12] Charlie Meaden: [00:05:12] low overheads was key. and then yeah. It was all real money. It was really all margin. It was all kind of margin, which is great. It was almost fully profitable because they would provide the materials and I would actually keep the leftover materials. Yeah. That's something that actually happens in jewelry in the jewelry industry.

[00:05:31] Yes, it is. You keep the metal, the offcuts and the shavings, and it's kind of like a yearly bonus. So you save up all of your precious metal for the year and then you, Then you hand it in and you got a bunch of money. Oh, that's. Which is cool. 

[00:05:47] Sam Kamani: [00:05:47] do better. You can do that with your code. 

[00:05:50] Charlie Meaden: [00:05:50] No, yeah, that's right.

[00:05:51] Sam Kamani: [00:05:51] Yeah. And you commented out something and then you have all the commented out code and you deposited somewhere and stack overflow. [00:06:00] We'll pay you for your comments. 

[00:06:01] Charlie Meaden: [00:06:01] Yeah. Would be amazing. I would have plenty of money now. 

[00:06:08]Sam Kamani: [00:06:08] And so, yeah, so, this brings me to the question. When was the first time you raised money for something?

[00:06:13] It doesn't have to be for a startup. It, it could be for anything. It could be for a non like non-for-profit challenge. What a 

[00:06:24] Charlie Meaden: [00:06:24] startup. Well, my first startup was, that I raised money for. I briefly. Got experience in a gamified recycling startup before starting my own, that which gave me the experience that I needed to really start my own business and start my own startup.

[00:06:40]not that that was even enough experience, but it was, it gave me the confidence to basically build a product and launch it quickly, which I think is key. and, yeah, it was, Oh, it must have been around 2016. Then I raised money for the first time for Uproar, which was a reward platform for [00:07:00] gamers. 

[00:07:00] Sam Kamani: [00:07:00] Yep.

[00:07:01] So then 

[00:07:02] Charlie Meaden: [00:07:02] yeah, certainly raise some money. Yeah. And I got going, 

[00:07:06] Sam Kamani: [00:07:06] how do you like, you know, I do get asked by a lot of founders all the time. How do you even get started? Where do you go? It's like. You can just go to people and say, Hey, give me money.  What was the first thing you did when you decided, okay.

[00:07:21] I want to raise some money. 

[00:07:22] Charlie Meaden: [00:07:22] Yeah. So I, first of all, I understood, I listened to a lot of podcasts. Write about a bunch of books. there's this kind of prevailing wisdom that you don't ask for money. You ask for advice. And that was really key to my strategy. So I basically went around, and I just looked at all of the possible places I could raise money from, from New Zealand.

[00:07:47] And then I just started building a relationship with those guys. Yeah. And in fact, I knew I was going to raise money for uproar when I was working at the previous startup. Yeah. So when I was at the previous startup, I was having some issues with the equity. [00:08:00] it wasn't being. Fairly 

[00:08:02] Sam Kamani: [00:08:02] divided. It 

[00:08:03] Charlie Meaden: [00:08:03] wasn't being contractually  okay.

[00:08:05] Yeah. so there was no contract for my sweat equity been doing, doing it for a year, not being paid, doing it sweat. And it was, it was fine anyway, because I knew it was a learning experience and it was a valuable experience anyway. But if, you know, if you're expecting something yeah. You should make sure that you get it.

[00:08:24]or if you're not going to get it, you should get out. So yeah. I knew I was going to raise money from these guys. So I just went and asked for some advice about something completely out of the, out of the realm of what I'd eventually asked them for. Yeah. And just started building a relationship. Yeah.

[00:08:40] That, yeah. Made some, made some friends in that meeting. Yep. And then, you know, went away for six months probably, 

[00:08:50]Sam Kamani: [00:08:50] the platform. 

[00:08:51] Charlie Meaden: [00:08:51] Well, I built bot from 30 days, but, you know, I ended that relationship and there was a, probably a, yeah, probably a decent chunk of [00:09:00] time before I spoke to them again. I'm Al rising, took, I think about four months for the first round.

[00:09:10] Yeah. roughly, which was good. It was very lucky to do it that way quick. 

[00:09:15] Sam Kamani: [00:09:15] That is, that is in New Zealand. It is. For music and standard. It's very, very quick because a lot of founders spend even up to a year of going after it. 

[00:09:27] Charlie Meaden: [00:09:27] I 

[00:09:27] Sam Kamani: [00:09:27] had some 

[00:09:27] Charlie Meaden: [00:09:27] key, I had some key investors were champions of may. Really? Yeah. So then the product and we can get into that later.

[00:09:37]yeah, where I just really built a good relationship with a few people. Yeah. They were, they trusted me. And I think that's very key is just to be transparent yourself, and try and invasively be true to what you say you're going to do and what you can go and do. And, you know, there were times where I'd have conversations with them when they knew I wanted to raise money from them, [00:10:00] but I would have a conversation with them, take the advice and I'd go away.

[00:10:02] And they wouldn't hear from me for a couple months. Yeah. And then I would go, I would go and achieve everything they said to do. That was relevant. 

[00:10:09]Sam Kamani: [00:10:09] Yup. Oh, that is, that is such good advice that you were showing them results before you in fact ask them for money. 

[00:10:19] Charlie Meaden: [00:10:19] Yeah. And I didn't care about going to coffee, you know, like, and getting a coffee with them.

[00:10:24] Cause I don't want coffee really. They don't want to waste half an hour of their time with small talk. Yeah. you know, I think for you want to make a really good first impression and build a rapport, so they want to hang out with you again. Yeah. 

[00:10:38] Sam Kamani: [00:10:38] Yeah, absolutely. 

[00:10:39] Charlie Meaden: [00:10:39] Well that's with anyone that's when you're recruiting.

[00:10:42] Yeah. that's when you're finding a partner in life, you know? Yeah. You just. Yeah. So anyway, built relationship with a few key players in the investment scene and they helped me drive the round over the line and raise the first capital. Oh, 

[00:10:58] Sam Kamani: [00:10:58] that's, that's very [00:11:00] inspiration. I'm sure it'll be very helpful for a few people.

[00:11:03]So what are you working on these days? 

[00:11:06]Charlie Meaden: [00:11:06] yeah, so, the new venture is Gembot. Yeah. Which is, as mentioned before systematic trading platform and fund. Yep. I've been working on that for quite a while actually, worked on it while working out my employment of, a previous startup yep. Or previous company.

[00:11:25] Should I say 

[00:11:26] Sam Kamani: [00:11:26] startup? 

[00:11:28]Charlie Meaden: [00:11:28] I built the strategy over really over 18 months over the last 18 months. We'll look at, what's coming up to kind of a couple years now. yeah, so yeah, about two years ago I started really jumping into investing. Yeah. And the public markets were the easiest way to get exposure to investments, the least barrier to entry it's permissionless.

[00:11:52] Yes. In many cases. And, started building a strong strategy, built off of a number of investors. [00:12:00] Yeah. And then data-driven kind of. Indicators basically. And I traded that for 18 months. last year my gains were over 130%. Oh, that's 

[00:12:15] Sam Kamani: [00:12:15] pretty impressive. 

[00:12:16] Charlie Meaden: [00:12:16] I figured at that point, the, it seemed repetitive.

[00:12:21] The strategy that I was using was the same thing over and over again. And I was like, Oh, There should be an algorithm. Yeah, I shouldn't be doing this. I can only manage 10 to 15 possessions at any given time. Yeah. it seems like I could basically yeah. Systematize it. Yeah. I have a close friend who I was also working with, who has a masters in mathematics and there's a great mathematician and engineer.

[00:12:48] Yeah, and we just started writing code together on, on Christmas Eve. And then we finished the first version by new year's Eve. Yeah. And, the rest is history and we've done, [00:13:00] done a crazy amount in the, in since December to now, today. we've raised money. we've. Piloted our fund strategy four times already and successfully closed those out.

[00:13:14] I've lost a quarter. So we did four, four funds in the quarter where they a return across each one. so of 68% for the quarter. Yeah. We provided investors a return of 54%. Yeah, that was a great six great success. 

[00:13:33] Sam Kamani: [00:13:33] Yeah. And 

[00:13:35] Charlie Meaden: [00:13:35] now we've built the platform and we've got a university initiative that we just started where we're taking.

[00:13:41] Sam Kamani: [00:13:41] How does that work? The university initiative, 

[00:13:44] Charlie Meaden: [00:13:44] sorry, set up this challenge where universe teams of university students can basically build off of some templates that we've given them and they can build their own strategies. And it's emulating what they'd really have to do if they was a [00:14:00] startup. Fondant.

[00:14:01] Yeah. So they have to create strategy. they gotta have a strategy deck to basically pitch to investors, which has us in this case. Yes. And then they will pay for trade and provide fund updates for 15 weeks. 

[00:14:15] Sam Kamani: [00:14:15] So for people who don't know what's paper trade, 

[00:14:17] Charlie Meaden: [00:14:17] can you design? Yeah. So paper trading is just where you trade on a market.

[00:14:23]and. It's not real money. It's play money. So you can sign up to paper trading accounts and get into investing without actually putting money on the table. You can also run right and run algorithms on paper trading, without any real money. Yep. we didn't take that approach cause we felt like. Real money would, make investors more interested?

[00:14:45] Yes. because you can run 10 paper trading accounts and just take out the one that's the best one and then show it to investors. So I put my money in, you know, through 2018, 2019 and grew it substantially. and again, [00:15:00] the, the, you know, we raised the money during COVID. And it was an accidental fundraise.

[00:15:06] Really? It was, we weren't planning on really raising any money and, a couple of individuals that are good friends of ours and trust us. Just really wants to get involved. Yeah. And they've been massive, highly active, highly engaged.  we raised a nice central fundraise, with some great guys that we trusted and they trusted us and we have great rapport. Yeah. And the rest is really history in that, in the fundraising sense. It was, it was very easy. 

[00:15:36] Sam Kamani: [00:15:36] Yeah. 

[00:15:37] Charlie Meaden: [00:15:37] Yeah. 

[00:15:38] Sam Kamani: [00:15:38] what, what was the easy bit?

[00:15:40] What made it easy? 

[00:15:42] Charlie Meaden: [00:15:42] We'd already had a rep. We already had a relationship with them. 

[00:15:45] Sam Kamani: [00:15:45] So the key is that build a relationship with people who would potentially invest in future. Yeah. That's that's about it. 

[00:15:52] Charlie Meaden: [00:15:52] It, wasn't no expectation of actually them investing. Yeah, they came to me before I left my previous company.

[00:16:00] [00:16:00] I'm saying, how can we help you move on and give you the money so that you could move on? Yeah. obviously not free, they take equity. but yeah, they, they really want to see me succeed and know that's very cool. And, and that is really key is you want to find people that really genuinely want you to win.

[00:16:20] Yup. And you don't always have to go after smart money. I think going after smart money is sometimes a distraction. Yeah. really you should just get stupid money and that money should be quiet while you go and execute, unless you're not going to execute. And then you may need that. Then you may need some more money, but yeah.

[00:16:40] You know, as long as, as long as you do your job, yeah. You should really not need much influence from investors. Especially early on. Yeah. Cause it's so speculative anyway. Yep. for us, it's not right because we're running a fund that does not speak to us. If we have a Mark, we have product market [00:17:00] fit. Yes.

[00:17:00] Whereas traditional SAS, startups and stuff, it's really difficult getting those early adopters and, you know, getting them to trust your trust. You're going to be around in three to six months. and so on and so on. So I think for us, we've been lucky in that this new venture is permissionless. Yeah. even if we couldn't raise any money yes.

[00:17:21] We could do it ourselves. Yeah. And it would just take a little bit longer. Yeah. I, 

[00:17:27] Sam Kamani: [00:17:27] that, that is really good. So the fact that you didn't need. Money that really hate that. Really? How do you go? 

[00:17:35] Charlie Meaden: [00:17:35] It also helps from a positioning standpoint. Yes. Because, I've been on the wrong side of negotiations where essentially I've given up a lot more of what I'd want to in a negotiation, whether it be equity or money or whatever.

[00:17:48] Yeah. Because I needed it. Yep. Yep. Fundraise. We were pot committed to the fundraise. Yeah. And we had some adjustments and valuation at the last minute. Yeah. [00:18:00] And I had to take it. 

[00:18:01] Sam Kamani: [00:18:01] Yeah. 

[00:18:02] Charlie Meaden: [00:18:02] And, 

[00:18:02] Sam Kamani: [00:18:02] makes sense, because you were desperate at that point. 

[00:18:05] Charlie Meaden: [00:18:05] So I left. The revenues of the jewelry business declined because I was focused on the fundraise because fundraising is very time consuming.

[00:18:13] Generally. It is. Yes. And you have to go to a lot of, a lot 

[00:18:17] Sam Kamani: [00:18:17] of, yeah. I would say it's like a full time job just fundraising itself, 

[00:18:20] Charlie Meaden: [00:18:20] but yeah. And emotionally 

[00:18:21] Sam Kamani: [00:18:21] it's draining 

[00:18:23] Charlie Meaden: [00:18:23] restraining in. You're going to these, you're kind of always on show. You're like the pony on show. Yes. When you're fundraising. Ah, I love that.

[00:18:32]I've done it twice and. It was okay. But actually after doing those two fundraisers, it's not something that I would yeah. Jumped back into. if I could avoid it, I mean, certain startups and certain situations. It's good to do it, but yeah, I, I don't like that part of fundraising where it's kind of all about signaling.

[00:18:55]yes, but you have to do it. 

[00:18:57]Sam Kamani: [00:18:57] if, someone wants to find [00:19:00] you, they do, they find you, if someone wants to connect with 

[00:19:03] Charlie Meaden: [00:19:03] you.

[00:19:04] Yeah. the best place to probably Twitter. Yep. Which is at uproar. Charlie. Yeah. Charlie, Charlie. And then obviously LinkedIn. I'm Charles Meagan on LinkedIn. Yep. And that's where you can also, 

[00:19:18] Sam Kamani: [00:19:18] they find your latest project as a gem bot gem 

[00:19:21] Charlie Meaden: [00:19:21] AI. 

[00:19:22] Sam Kamani: [00:19:22] And what about the university? The challenge 

[00:19:24] Charlie Meaden: [00:19:24] yesterday, university challenges, challenged dot.

[00:19:26] Jim ball and the registrations just closed last night. Cool. So, but we're going to be doing content all the way through, so if anyone's interested in investing yeah. Definitely follow along and learn a lot about investing and how it works. 

[00:19:45] Sam Kamani: [00:19:45] So what are you looking for next? Are you looking for team members, investors, customers, users.

[00:19:52] What are you looking 

[00:19:53] Charlie Meaden: [00:19:53] for? What's your ask my ask. Interesting. yeah, I mean, we're always looking for talented [00:20:00] people, for sure. Yeah. we're looking for problem solvers, you know, yeah. That's why we're doing this challenge. We want the smartest people to come work for us. yeah, so yeah, I mean, if, if there are any interesting and, talented problem-solvers out there that look at the world and from a little bit of a different lens, not a traditional lens, then that's kind of the sort of person we're looking for at the moment I lost really.

[00:20:27] Yeah. I mean, and, obviously, you know, if you are in a, if you, you know, if someone does see this and they're in a position where they can. in become a customer of jumble then. Yeah. That is something that, 

[00:20:40] Sam Kamani: [00:20:40] so what happens, what sort of people does gem bot it's customers? And 

[00:20:45] Charlie Meaden: [00:20:45] so at the moment we are, we have two models.

[00:20:48] Yes. we have, credited investors, accredited and wholesale investors that can invest. and we don't take a management fee or advisory fee. We just take a carry on the profit. Yup. [00:21:00] so we're trying to be different and not just take money for the sake of holding someone's money. We want to only make revenue if we get profits.

[00:21:08] Yeah. I think that's very important. and then we're also doing a, a debt raise as well. So that's kind of not so much general investors. You know, I don't generally won't really take that on. Yeah. That's more on something that a slightly larger institution will do, where they can get a guaranteed rate of return on their investment, even though it's not.

[00:21:33] You know, potentially as much as they'd get, if they became a customer of gem bot. Yeah. So that's yeah. So those are the two customers we're looking for at the moment were being rather selective with who we bring in, just because of the nature of it. And we want to have a good relationship with our customers and kind of they're coming along for the journey really.

[00:21:53]which was obviously already got customers and yeah. I grabbing at the right. We want [00:22:00] to. 

[00:22:00]Sam Kamani: [00:22:00] That's great. finally, this is the top three things. So what is the book you are listening to on or reading currently, or one book recommendation? 

[00:22:13] Charlie Meaden: [00:22:13] My favorite book is that it 

[00:22:16] Sam Kamani: [00:22:16] kind of could be a favorite book or could be the one that you are reading now 

[00:22:19] Charlie Meaden: [00:22:19] could be.

[00:22:20] Yeah, I think hood. I mean, I have so many and I was going to just pick one. I would go for this for stealing fire. Yeah. Sidney Pfizer. Great book. 

[00:22:29] Sam Kamani: [00:22:29] who is it by ID? No, screw 

[00:22:32] Charlie Meaden: [00:22:32] that by

[00:22:37] okay. Stealing, stealing on fire by Steven Kotler. Yep. Cool. Yeah. Stealing fire by thieves. So I'll put the link in my, one of my favorites. 

[00:22:49]Sam Kamani: [00:22:49] any podcast recommendation was the podcast that you listened to. 

[00:22:53]Charlie Meaden: [00:22:53] this weekend startups, one of my favorites.  And then, Jason Calacanis and has just [00:23:00] started a new podcast called the Olin podcast.

[00:23:02] Yeah. I heard about that, which I've been checking it out enjoying too. and then of course the novel podcast. Yeah. those are. yeah, those are the top three, 

[00:23:14] Sam Kamani: [00:23:14] but 

[00:23:15] Charlie Meaden: [00:23:15] I've, I've moved away from this week and start that. So I think for new entrepreneurs, yes, it's very helpful to understand the minds of what Silicon Valley is thinking.

[00:23:24] Yeah. Even though I think the generally Silicon Valley is. deteriorating and losing its edge. but it gives you a good idea of like the benchmark of where things kind of, and the thinking is. say for a new entrepreneur, looking to kind of really gain then a broader knowledge base of what is happening in the startup scene.

[00:23:42] I think that this week in startups is essential and there are thousands of episodes already. So you can Benj then Johnny 

[00:23:49] Sam Kamani: [00:23:49] is. Yeah. Yup. next, the last one is if time and money were off, no question. If you had unlimited time unlimited money, [00:24:00] what would you work on? What project? What would you build? 

[00:24:05] Charlie Meaden: [00:24:05] Oh, that's a good one.

[00:24:06] Isn't it? 

[00:24:08] Sam Kamani: [00:24:08] well, 

[00:24:09] Charlie Meaden: [00:24:09] I mean, it may sound a little cliche, but I'm enjoying what I'm doing right now. so I try not to think too much about money, although obviously I'm working at a fund. So the, the, the objective is just to make money really. so. 

[00:24:26] Sam Kamani: [00:24:26] It couldn't be the one that you're working on. 

[00:24:28] Charlie Meaden: [00:24:28] Yeah. I mean, I can't see myself doing anything different right now.

[00:24:31] Yeah. and the reason I like it is cause it's just really hard problems. Yes. I like holding, like, solving problems. So if I could just sit in a room and tinker and solve problems for the rest of my life and do jujitsu at the same time. Yeah. Not at the same time, but you know, separately. 

[00:24:50] Sam Kamani: [00:24:50] Good to be. Same time.

[00:24:52]Charlie Meaden: [00:24:52] Yeah, I would, yeah, I would do pretty much what I'm doing now. I think that even their happiness is kind of upskill. [00:25:00] You should just try and build your life to be as close to what you want it to be as possible from a schedule perspective in thinking about what you're spending your time on. So the moment I spend a lot of time, you know, with my family.

[00:25:16] Yeah. Doing a sport I enjoy. And then yeah. solving hard problems. Yeah. And that's, to me, that's actually. You know, success or success from a monetary standpoint. Yeah. aside, I'm pretty happy just doing what I'm doing. 

[00:25:33] Sam Kamani: [00:25:33] No, that's great. That's really, yeah, I'm sure it would be very beneficial. Everything that you have saved for someone who is just starting out who this wanting to either raise money or who have raised money.

[00:25:46]and just even just for their own startup and personal journey, lots of insights out there. I will put all the links underneath, in the show notes. any Vaden, whatever platform you would be listening to. 

[00:25:58]You so much for listening to this [00:26:00] episode of one money, got money with Sam Kamani, hope you enjoyed the show and got some valuable insights that would help you in your startup or your business. If you haven't already please subscribe and rate them, show on your favorite platform, it would be extremely helpful.

[00:26:18] And I just cannot tell you how much I would appreciate that.