Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani

5: How to pitch according to a Venture Capitalist - Brenden Kumarasamy

August 01, 2020 Brenden Kumarasamy
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
5: How to pitch according to a Venture Capitalist - Brenden Kumarasamy
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Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
5: How to pitch according to a Venture Capitalist - Brenden Kumarasamy
Aug 01, 2020
Brenden Kumarasamy

My guest this episode is Brenden Kumarasamy. He is a 🍁Canadian venture capitalist and a consultant with IBM. Brenden is also the founder of MasterTalk the YouTube channel he started to help the world master the art of public speaking and communication. He coaches purpose driven entrepreneurs on how to master their message and share their ideas with the world.

In this episode Brenden shares,

  • How to explain your startup/idea so people can understand
  • Why public speaking skills are important
  • Mistakes tech founders make
  • How the ability to be a better speaker has helped him
  • and much more...

You can connect with Brenden here👇
mastertalk.ca| : linkedin.com/in/brendenkumarasamy
Youtube:- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBYFP4mZLQovr7W6Si6sueA
Book recommendations:- https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/562193/thirst-by-scott-harrison-contribution-by-lisa-sweetingham/
Podcast recommendations:- https://mastersofscale.com/ 

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

Show Notes Transcript

My guest this episode is Brenden Kumarasamy. He is a 🍁Canadian venture capitalist and a consultant with IBM. Brenden is also the founder of MasterTalk the YouTube channel he started to help the world master the art of public speaking and communication. He coaches purpose driven entrepreneurs on how to master their message and share their ideas with the world.

In this episode Brenden shares,

  • How to explain your startup/idea so people can understand
  • Why public speaking skills are important
  • Mistakes tech founders make
  • How the ability to be a better speaker has helped him
  • and much more...

You can connect with Brenden here👇
mastertalk.ca| : linkedin.com/in/brendenkumarasamy
Youtube:- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBYFP4mZLQovr7W6Si6sueA
Book recommendations:- https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/562193/thirst-by-scott-harrison-contribution-by-lisa-sweetingham/
Podcast recommendations:- https://mastersofscale.com/ 

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

5: How to pitch your idea with Brenden Kumarasamy

Brenden: [00:00:00] I guess speaking specifically to the tech community, I realized that a lot of technical founders were very strong at product knew exactly how to be customer obsessed, knew how to build a product, to meet the needs of their consumers, but had a lot of trouble communicated in a way that a nontechnical person, someone who doesn't understand their tech stack.

[00:00:18]would say, Oh, I can introduce you to X, Y, and Z. So there was like a gap in the market where I wanted to say, let me give basic communication tools that anybody can master, whether you're a 16 year old girl to a tech entrepreneur, to a Baker and empower everyone to use those tools and share ideas with people 

[00:00:37]Welcome to another episode of one money got money with Sam Kamani.

[00:00:43] Sam Kamani: [00:00:43] This podcast is for founders and entrepreneurs and dreamers. Like you.

[00:00:48]In this episode, my guest is Brenden Kumarasamy. He is a Canadian venture capitalist, a consultant with IBM and founder of MasterTalk. So let's hear from him.  Welcome to the show, Brenden.

[00:01:03] Sam Kamani: [00:01:03] I'd love to know a bit more about who you are and what you do and how you got there. 

[00:01:09]Brenden: [00:01:09] Yeah, for sure. Absolutely. Sam, I started to me on, so it ends Brendan and I'm the founder of master talk.

[00:01:14] I make YouTube videos on public speaking so that I can help the world master the art of communication should have their ideas with the world. For me, how I got started was when I was at university, I used to do these things called case competitions. So think of it like professional sports, but for nerds.

[00:01:30] So the same way other guys, they would eat chicken and I'm like, what sports or play sports? I still ate the same chicken wings, but I was watching presentations. how other universities would be presenting, how other people would give a speech. And in the cert three years, I presented over 500 times, competed in many of these competition, coached a bunch of people and also did a year in venture capital.

[00:01:55] So after I graduated. And I started working in the industry. I asked myself a very different question, which was how do I use my time and expertise to add value to people? And that's when the idea for master talk came. So I guess speaking specifically to the tech community, I realized that a lot of technical founders were very strong at product knew exactly how to be customer obsessed, knew how to build a product, to meet the needs of their consumers, but had a lot of trouble communicated in a way that a nontechnical person, someone who doesn't understand their tech stack.

[00:02:26] would say, Oh, I can introduce you to X, Y, and Z. So there was like a gap in the market where I wanted to say, let me give basic communication tools that anybody can master, whether you're a 16 year old girl to a tech entrepreneur, to a Baker and empower everyone to use those tools and share ideas with people

[00:02:46]Sam Kamani: [00:02:46] that is fantastic.

[00:02:47] And I can. Hundred percent relate. I was trained initially as a developer and then I've run businesses, work with startups, but I never shared my story and I never shared any of my knowledge. I was just keeping to my own bubble. And something happened a year and a half, two years ago. I think I thought, okay, cool stuff.

[00:03:09] It I'm going to go out and I'm going to talk, I'm going to speak at events. I'm going to speak at podcasts, go and go into live webinars, do all sorts of things and just learn by doing however, I do follow people on YouTube people like you. And so when I found your video, I was like, Oh, this is really cool.

[00:03:26] I can learn a lot from you. I would love to have you on the show. So just going back a bit about, about the chase, it, was it a bit like Toastmasters, or was it bit different than those masters? Yeah. 

[00:03:40] Brenden: [00:03:40] So this is a good analogy here that I think your audience will appreciate. So Toastmasters is a great organization.

[00:03:45] I'm a member I speak at other clubs mostly to promote the video so they can use them. But Toastmasters is like being on easy to intermediate mode. It's really for people who are getting started. So the developer that you were when you started, all technical Toastmasters, a great way to start, but now, you're at a point in your life where you're saying, Hey, I want to start keynoting.

[00:04:06] I want to start getting on podcasts now. So now that you're onto the next level, now you need to go to the next thing, which is, hiring a speech, coach, watching more YouTube videos. Gaining a community and then, getting mentors and feedback. Yeah. But the differences in case these competitions, it was a lot more intense.

[00:04:24] So it's like going to the business Olympics is a good example. So just to give context to people, a lot of the individuals who compete in competitions do it to work at companies like McKinsey, BCG, Bain, all of those companies, wall street as well. A lot of the bankers. The feeder school for a lot of these positions, people think it's the Ivy league.

[00:04:44] Yeah, that's true. They hire a lot of those people, but the real feeder school is the people who case who compete in case competitions. So a lot of my friends ended up going to work at these companies because they all did competitions together. So that's where I learned the skill. And it's very different from Toastmasters as you were mentioning.

[00:05:01] is there a. Age limit. Is that something that you have to be under 20 or under something to take part in this? Is it just out of university or is it open for anyone at any age group? You got it. So it was mostly for business students and undergrad or MBA level. So let's say when you entered a business school and undergrad, right?

[00:05:21] That's when you get to compete in these competitions, that's specific specifically to that faculty, but they've also opened these types of opportunities to the engineering faculty too, at some universities. So unfortunately it's not available to most people, but I think the great thing about, this experience is now I'm able to share all those resources that you can learn from it.

[00:05:39] So one thing I'd recommend people to do is you want to get into a group with other tech founders who are interested in communication skills and you all pitch to each other. So that way, it's a lot easier to improve together and be better. 

[00:05:54] Sam Kamani: [00:05:54] That is a fantastic idea. In fact, yeah, I belong to a discord group.

[00:05:58]I think it's called startups or entrepreneurship or one of those, and they often have these. a pitch group sessions where everyone joins in on zoom from all around the world, especially now it used to be done in LA, but now because of covert and stuff for the last few months, pretty much it's opened up the whole world to everyone.

[00:06:20]it is, it's been amazing in that way that it has allowed collaboration at the next level. And. Everyone gets together. Everyone gives their pitch, gives their five minute pitch. And then 10, 15 minutes of question answer as if and everyone else acts as a VC or an angel investor at that time. And then the one person is giving a pitch and we just rotate around on that.

[00:06:47] And that was really cool. So cool to do that. Sorry. However, I would understand that you know that you won't get the Jay's name. If you do some organic things, just that your friends are, with people, but yeah, no, that's fine. So how did you end up in the forest? VC job.

[00:07:04] And what did he do there? 

[00:07:06] Brenden: [00:07:06] Yeah, absolutely. So when I was in university, I was pretty standard, conventional you're like, I want to be like an accountant at a big four accounting firm. I want to go work at McKinsey and do you know the standard stuff. But I think what was interesting is I read a book that I'm sure you're very familiar with the one by Peter fetus.

[00:07:22] Yes. About how you built the future and how he, his thought process. And I said, let me dive into this world, because it's interesting about a VC is you have the conventional salary of a normal employee, but you spend every day talking to unconventional people. So what I learned. When I did VC. So I was a student VC for, for, for a student run fund.

[00:07:45] So for those who don't know, is it like an analyst or do a role of an analyst or something else? Yeah. I'm happy to talk through this. Yeah. So in the us, there's a fund called dorm room fund. So how that works, I forgot which VC was funding it, but it's like a part of their arm. So what are the insights that they've gone to market is most.

[00:08:06] Of the great startups that were born in the last decade, almost a LA a big percentage of them came from college campuses, think Snapchat, Facebook, et cetera, not all of them, but a good percentage. But since venture capitalists don't have time to source the deals in university because they have so many referrals from entrepreneurs in their portfolio, what they do because they created a student fund where students source the deals.

[00:08:32]we go into universities, we see what startups are out there and they would we would pick out some of those stuff and we'd give them a think of it like a pre seed check. So it'd be like the first check. So we brought that model to Canada and I was a part of the second.

[00:08:47] Cohort it's called front row ventures. It's like a small fine from the front row ventures. Yeah. Interesting. yeah. So for those that don't know the small part of real ventures, who's one of the biggest early seed investors in Canada. And I was a part of their investment arm in the second cohort. So basically what I did for the year as I just had a bunch of first round meetings, a lot of founders.

[00:09:09] And since I was the case competition, because I didn't have a technical background, but I knew a lot about startups. I wouldn't attack the business. I would attack how they were pitching the business. So would try and finding as many holes to start to understand what the founder's point of view is on the industry and how that point of view is different from everyone else in the sector.

[00:09:31] So that's where I learned a lot of those skills and I brought that skillset with the master talk and I combined the two to create the communication skills that I show in a lot of my videos today.

[00:09:42]Sam Kamani: [00:09:42] Oh, that is really cool. So now are you still working with the same VC fund along with mass? the tr YouTube video channel, or is.

[00:09:54] Something, are you doing something different? 

[00:09:57] Brenden: [00:09:57] Yes. So it's like a mix of everything. so I wanted to try out what it was like working as a consultant to actually work right now as a technology consultant at IBM, but on the side much like what you mentioned. I do a lot of those pitch things too.

[00:10:09] So I coach people one-on-one and I make their pitch, but I also participate for free. And those get togethers where I give feedback for people. and I'm still only an advisor for the fund. So I S so I still, so I do a bit of VC now, a bit of one-on-one coaching, a bit of YouTube, actually, a lot of YouTube and, IBM as well as the job.

[00:10:27] So I'm Jack, I'm doing everything, basically. 

[00:10:31] Sam Kamani: [00:10:31] Everyone does, hustling. Yeah. But it's, it's, I'm sure you enjoy it. And I can see it from your enthusiasm that you really love doing what you do. I would love to dig more into that this whole pitching thing, and a lot of founders. Watch this and I, I'm a foam believer that you never stopped pitching.

[00:10:53]you have to pitch to your customers that you know why they should use your product. You have to pitch to your employees that why they should work for you. You are the best, even if you don't have investors, you still have to pitch your idea to hundreds of people and you will have to keep doing that.

[00:11:09] As long as you run your startup, if you are the founder of your startup, you are the chief evangelist. You have to go and preach about your startup or your product or your service. So I would love to know more about, what are some tips you can give to any founder listening to this podcast. 

[00:11:28]Brenden: [00:11:28] you took the words right out of my mouth as to why I see the exact same thing.

[00:11:33] Sam a pitcher's is an everyday thing. You're always fighting Ching to different people all the time. But what I would say is the biggest mistake I've seen people make that not many people talk about is this idea of having different versions of the same pitch. So whenever a founder thinks of a pitch, they go, okay, I need to get ready for demo day.

[00:11:50] And then I got to pitch my five minutes and that's my pitch deck. But what they don't understand is that's one version of the pitch, but then there's another version for when you're meeting VCs. One-on-one where you go through a lot more details and they already understand the business and what you're trying to do.

[00:12:06] That's why you got the meeting in the first place, and then you have another pitch. For when you talk to prospect of employees, you don't want to be too complicated with the tech stack. They'll just be like, who cares? Talk to me about the vision. I have 30 other job offers, And all that stuff.

[00:12:20]so I think the big thing most people need to get focused on is that, and the second thing. Is what Michael CBOs, the CEO of Y Combinator. Yes. He talks about this idea of the one sentence example. So based on what he says is if you can't explain to your mom in one sentence, what you do, then you don't understand your business.

[00:12:41] And I get so much pushback from founders that I work with. I always say the following. So there's one company in our portfolio when I was a VC called NVivo AI. And basically what they do is that they're an AI company that parses through pharmaceutical data to look for toxicity levels, to figure out drugs that we're supposed to do fail in the FDA process two years later.

[00:13:03] But. Because of toxicity, but they would find out in the first six months that the drug was too toxic, so they can stop production right away and save billions of dollars to pharma companies. So those that's really complicated, but how Daniel Cohen is the CEO of the company pitches it, he just says we're in Viva Lai, and we help pharmaceutical companies save money through artificial intelligence and data science.

[00:13:26] Simple. So if will be that I see this is if that guy. Who's parsing data and has so many models. I can't even explain what he's doing. It's too technical for me. If he can explain his business in one sentence. Everyone else can. And a good analogy I like to use is Airbnb. You can say Airbnb is a marketplace between buyers and sellers exchanging real estate assets for the profit and benefit of both parties.

[00:13:49] Or you can just say print. Yeah. That sounds or you could just, Airbnb allows you to rent out the extra room in your house to make a bit of money. Yeah, it is keeping it simple and removing the corporate jargon and all the unnecessary complexity that. For some reason people like, but yeah. So now that is really good.

[00:14:17] Have you, when you work with all these young founders, there is a lot of energy. They emit just by being themselves. Did you ever feel like jumping in the arena yourself and starting your own startup and building a product or a service or something? Great question. And I'm happy to talk for, I love that you asked you that.

[00:14:39] So if there's anything I've learned from my experience in venture and IBM is knowing what you're good at and what you're. So here's what I'm really good at. I'm really good at pitch. You bring me any slide deck. I will find holes. That's why a lot of the, like I started coaching CEO's when I was 23 and they take me seriously because.

[00:14:58] I don't tell them I'm a coach. I just say, show me your pitch deck. And let me tell you what you can do better. And then they're going to say, okay, this guy does. But what I also learned was I am not the guy who jumps in the friends. That's why, when I was a VC, I never give advice on how to run a bit.

[00:15:14] You're the guy who gives advice on how to run a business because you've been in the trenches and I would never do that. But what I will say is I also know what I can build. So the thesis that will be more interesting for you behind master talk is a lot bigger than just a YouTube channel. So what I noticed right in the sector was when Dale Carnegie was alive, was like the famous public speaking mentor that we all look up to.

[00:15:37] The issue with him is he was born in long time period of history. And this, the sentence that we only have a book to remember him by. We don't have anything else. We don't have video clips or anything, but what's interesting about our sector and public speaking coaching is most of the information is behind a paywall.

[00:15:56] And the reason is because as you've seen from the industry, a lot of the pitch coaches, in the sector charts three, 500, as an hour, they're very high end demand, which means they're not incentivized to create free content for everybody else. Who cares. you have 15 seat. Go ahead.

[00:16:14]Sam Kamani: [00:16:14] yes and no. The good ones who want to build a name for themselves, they provide. Free content on YouTube. It's I'm, you might be familiar. Or of that YouTube channel. I think it's called Karishma on demand or something like that. so they, there is a little free content now because that's how you get your name known and people get your service.

[00:16:39] If they know you, if no one, you could have the best product in the world, if no one knows you, no one is ever going to buy you. So you have to do that. I feel like that anyway. 

[00:16:48]Brenden: [00:16:48] so this is interesting. So for everyone who's listening right now to our conversation, I want to debrief. So this is me as the speaking coach bringing him back forever.

[00:16:55] So what's interesting about this and you've seen the salmon your life. I'm sure the best founders have a unique point of view on the world that everybody else disagrees with. So notice how Sam just said, what do you mean? So my counter to him. Very bluntly is yeah. Chris won command. You're right.

[00:17:12] Nothing to do with startups and public speaking. That's just charisma and confidence material. And he talks about flirting. Like Charlie Hooper. It's the channel owner for this. So notice that as a founder, now that I'm speaking, I know my customer where that anyone in the same way that when I pull coals in Sam's business, he's going to say, what are you talking about?

[00:17:28] Brendan boa. So bringing him back to this you're right. In the context of confidence in general, but it comes to public speaking specifically. I challenge you to find another channel that is as generous with the content as mine is. Cause the thing is with Charlie is he's very good with, charisma and confidence and dating, but does he tell you how to control your pace?

[00:17:54] Does he tell you how to vary your vocal tones? He doesn't do that because he doesn't know how to teach it. Yeah, there is a very small percentage of individuals who can speak really well and teach it. And the reason is because most people who are very good at public speaking do not teach it. They're CEOs of companies, they're partners at McKinsey.

[00:18:15] They work as a public speaking coach, sometimes some sometimes, but not always, but the people who do that. They're in a very small number of people and almost all of them, all of their free content is garbage, absolute trash. When I was 22, I was in my basement. So in other words, to answer your question, I am building a startup.

[00:18:37] It's just not a technology startup. Cause he nervous. Yeah. Yeah. It can't be immediate. It could be an agency. It could be any sort of realm you got it. so the thesis for my company is simple. I want to democratize all of the information so that after I die, Every change maker in the world who wants to master their public speaking skills and can't afford a speech coach.

[00:19:02] Cause they're still in their seed round. They haven't raised a mil yet in a series, a round or something can still rely on me. Can still look at my videos and, I proved out the model because a lot of the technical founders in Montreal or the different local cities that I work with, they watched my videos religiously.

[00:19:18]Even if I don't have, I don't have a million subscribers, but the hundred people who watched me, aren't like, five-year-olds. They're like, Oh, like I'm the CEO of this company. I'm trying to raise half a mil and whatever. And then some of them buy coaching or whatever, but that's not the point.

[00:19:30]But the thesis behind the company is how do I create a world where nobody is scared of public speaking? So basically what I'm saying is, I don't know how to tech, I don't know how to code and all that stuff, but I have enough insight to say. This is where I think the future is going because half the world isn't connected to the internet yet.

[00:19:49] And I want to be, I want to build the public space, death star and be more generous than everyone else and take the whole industry.

[00:19:56]Sam Kamani: [00:19:56] that is the way to go. I haven't that person believe it doesn't matter if you are teaching coding or you're teaching sales or you're teaching public speaking, you have to give free content, you how to, brew and why not share knowledge?

[00:20:09] Why put it behind the paywall? So that is what I believe in, that's why I don't have. Any ads or anything on my podcast and stuff. and even the first book, the 30 day startup, I often make it free and I give it out for free because I want people to go and learn from it and do, and go and build stuff.

[00:20:30] Because when people do stuff, the world becomes better. That's that's just my belief, but anyway, 

[00:20:35]Brenden: [00:20:35] we share the same belief. That's why I don't like the other speech coaches. Cause they charge a lot of money and they don't offer. Money. they don't offer content like Chris Mon command does, or I do, so yeah, set up that is.

[00:20:48] Sam Kamani: [00:20:48] That is really good. What is one challenge that you think you're facing in this journey of going out and teaching founders, how to patch our teaching CEOs, how to patch? 

[00:21:01] Brenden: [00:21:01] Yeah, for sure. So I would say challenge, not that many challenges for CEO's specifically. And the reason is because they have a very high incentive to learn public speaking, but I would say challenge with the YouTube channel.

[00:21:16] That I'm always thinking through is video ideas, public speaking, you wholly talk about so much. So you need to be very creative about the way that you come up with new ideas. So back to being customer obsessed, I'm sure you say this and you plow this into the founders you work with. I get dinners coffees, breakfast with a lot of my, the people that watch my videos to get the ideas out of them.

[00:21:39]for example, the script I wrote today was how to sell anything to anyone, right? How do you sell your ideas? So I made a script like that. Then yesterday it was, how do you present to an audience who you've never met and things like that. So I'd always be creative about those new ideas that is great now, 

[00:21:56]Sam Kamani: [00:21:56] What are, since you have been in the VC and tech environment, do you have any examples of what some founders do, Or, how did you guys choose? Because I'm sure you would get more bitches, do a startup, then you could realistically fund. how did you choose some founders or others? 

[00:22:19]Brenden: [00:22:19] And everyone's got their own take on this. I'm going to avoid the usual stuff that we always start, product market fit and all that stuff.

[00:22:24] So I'll focus on 

[00:22:25] Sam Kamani: [00:22:25] early stages, very hard student. when you're in a student stage, no one has got a product market fit. Everyone just has an idea at very early. This is pre seed stage. 

[00:22:35]Brenden: [00:22:35] but even in those situations, so in our fund specific, and this is front revenge, adventurous, super early, we're the earliest.

[00:22:41] Even for us, we need to see a product or else we won't put them on. 

[00:22:44]Sam Kamani: [00:22:44] absolutely. You have to see a product. 

[00:22:46] Brenden: [00:22:46] Absolutely. so for me, this is my personal tickle ad like my own flavor on this for me, what I do in pitch meetings is I don't ask the standard questions. Instead, what I do is a challenge, the founder's point of view on their startup.

[00:23:02] So let's say for example, they say. we're trying to build a construction, SAS product for construction workers, but they don't clearly explain what the benefit is and why anyone would pay for it. Then I would pull coals at the point of view, and I do that a lot by figuring out the elements of their pitch that they haven't thought through.

[00:23:22] So I would say if there's one underlying thing that. That the best founders get right then everyone else doesn't is they have a big, strong point of view on how the world should be. And I'm using Vinod costless words. There was the founder of Khosla ventures. He says that a lot. And the sense of the best founders know exactly where they want to go after the build out the iteration of the product and nothing that you will tell them is going to get in the way.

[00:23:48] So Mark Andreessen said this too, that I liked, he said the best founders. Are pricks in many ways, because an average, not a prick is in their bad person, but in the sense that we're for your audience also hate me, but I've been for the sense of, if I tell an average founder, Hey, did you think of this? They would respond with, Oh, maybe I did it actually.

[00:24:07] That's a good idea, but let me write this down. Rez, the best founders in the world, you ask the same question. They look at you and go. duh, of course I thought of this already did this, like 74 times. I know customer more than you do. Why are you giving me advice? Those are the founders I love. So for example, whenever, and they're not necessarily right, but it's the people that have a strong belief system in their point of view.

[00:24:29] So when people try and poke holes in master talk, I go and they say, Oh, public speaking is a really nice topic. You'll never get to a million subscribers. And I go, what are you talking about? Toastmasters as 350,000 members. And those are the people who do take the step to master public speaking.

[00:24:48] Most people don't even take that step. So what if I just give them videos that they can watch in their basement alone? The market potential is way bigger than when people are. 

[00:24:56] Sam Kamani: [00:24:56] Oh, absolutely way, way, way, bigger, but yeah, I a hundred percent agree with you do not give up, teaching and sharing out all this content for free.

[00:25:07] It takes a, it takes some time if beauty by dead give up, then he had after two or three years, he still had just 30,000 followers or something like that. He would not have reached 106 million. It takes a very long time. And especially when you're starting now, the whole YouTube space ecosystem is extremely crowded.

[00:25:29] So it will sometime, if your content is good and. And if you are going out and putting yourself out there's nothing stopping you over time and being consistent. 

[00:25:41]Brenden: [00:25:41] and just so people understand like what I do day to day as well. I actually write out my content five years in advance.

[00:25:49]That's all obsessive. I am. I write a YouTube script pretty much every day. And I record my videos a year in it. So that's how obsessive I am about winning, because right now this is guilt. Give people insight. Cause a lot of people are tech founders. So they might like this right now as a record.

[00:26:06] I am, as far as I know the youngest speech coach in the world, because remember I'm 24. But I coach CEOs on public speaking in tech startups mostly. So I have a huge time advantage over every one of my other competitors in the space. So if I start off and be extremely generous by the time I'm 30, I'll win the market.

[00:26:26]So it's always about understanding what person. Yeah, absolutely.  

[00:26:30] Sam Kamani: [00:26:30] That is really good. Now, before we finish, I have this stop three sort of thing. What is one book you are reading currently, or a book that you recommend founders should read? Yeah. 

[00:26:41] Brenden: [00:26:41] Yes. So this is more for like impact social driven founders.

[00:26:45] That my number one book of all time is thirst by Scott Harrison talks about a guy who built one of the largest nonprofits in the world. And it used to be a nightclub promoter. I think the way that he thinks about branding and storytelling is really exceptional. Highly recommend the read. 

[00:27:00] Sam Kamani: [00:27:00] Yep. I will put the link in the comment. in the description or whichever platform you're looking at second one, is there a podcast you listen to on a regular basis? 

[00:27:14] Brenden: [00:27:14] I would say for me, there's a bunch, but I would say the biggest one for startups specifically would be masters of scale by Reid Hoffman.

[00:27:22] More like the earlier episodes are much better than the later ones. If I'm being honest, like season one, season two, and I would specifically recommend the one he did with EV Williams, the founder of Twitter, who was also the founder of media. That was my favorite one. So I'd highly encourage people to check that one out.

[00:27:38] Sam Kamani: [00:27:38] Perfect. I'll put a link to that as well. And if you had unlimited time and money and resources, what would you build or what would you work on? 

[00:27:50]Brenden: [00:27:50] I would plow a lot more money into master talk and I would solve the water crisis. Those are the two things that is absolutely amazing. Mind blowing.

[00:28:01] Sam Kamani: [00:28:01] Finally, where do. People find you and is, do you have an ask? Like I looking for something, 

[00:28:10] Brenden: [00:28:10] nothing in particular, but if anyone says any questions, concerns, complaints, feel free to message me on Instagram and that master your talk, I'm not famous or anything. So just send me a message. And if you want to check out my YouTube videos and you're working on a pitch deck, you want to get better with your public speaking skills.

[00:28:26] That's master talk in one word. Perfect. I'll put all those links. Thank you so much for coming here, talking to us, being on the show. I got to learn a lot. I'm sure a lot of other founders would get to learn as well. and also we'll follow your YouTube thank you so much, Brendan.

[00:28:44] Thank you, Sam.

[00:28:46] 

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