Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani

9: Leveraging human connection to fund your dreams with guest - Scott Aaron

August 15, 2020 Sam Kamani, Scott Aaron
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
9: Leveraging human connection to fund your dreams with guest - Scott Aaron
Chapters
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
9: Leveraging human connection to fund your dreams with guest - Scott Aaron
Aug 15, 2020
Sam Kamani, Scott Aaron

In this episode I interview Scott Aaron, he is a founder and sales and lead generation coach 💪. He is also an internationally acclaimed and award-winning online marketer, 2x best-selling author, top podcaster and speaker. He is considered by many as the go-to specialist when it comes to converting traffic, establishing connections, creating income and building personal brands on LinkedIn.

In this episode he shares his experience of raising money for a not for profit venture and how human connection can be your superpower. 

He also takes us on his journey of starting a not for profit event and how he managed to raise money and make it happen.

You can find and connect with him here 👇
https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottaaroncoach/
http://www.scottaaron.net/
http://www.linkedleadsgeneration.com/
https://twitter.com/PhillyFitGuy

Book recommendation
https://www.amazon.com/Yes-Destination-How-You-There/dp/0966398130

Podcast recommendation
https://fortheloveofmoney.com/

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode I interview Scott Aaron, he is a founder and sales and lead generation coach 💪. He is also an internationally acclaimed and award-winning online marketer, 2x best-selling author, top podcaster and speaker. He is considered by many as the go-to specialist when it comes to converting traffic, establishing connections, creating income and building personal brands on LinkedIn.

In this episode he shares his experience of raising money for a not for profit venture and how human connection can be your superpower. 

He also takes us on his journey of starting a not for profit event and how he managed to raise money and make it happen.

You can find and connect with him here 👇
https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottaaroncoach/
http://www.scottaaron.net/
http://www.linkedleadsgeneration.com/
https://twitter.com/PhillyFitGuy

Book recommendation
https://www.amazon.com/Yes-Destination-How-You-There/dp/0966398130

Podcast recommendation
https://fortheloveofmoney.com/

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

Scott Aaron: [00:00:00] You know, just be yourself, the number one business tool that we all have that no one's using is our ability to create connection with other people. Everyone's relying on automation and technology. When they're forgetting about the most valuable tool that you have, the number one sales tool that you have.

[00:00:18] Yep. It's yourself and too many people are trying to take themselves out of the equation, you know, myself and my, our business. 

[00:00:27] Sam Kamani: [00:00:27] Yes. While 

[00:00:28] Scott Aaron: [00:00:28] wildly successful. But we're still on the phone every single day with discovery calls and networking and podcasting, you know, she's upstairs in her office, I'm downstairs in mind.

[00:00:39] And then we meet in the middle of the end of the day. It never stops one or two because you know what? We love people. If you're in a business. That involves someone else to make a monetary decision, whether it's to an angel investor or whether it's a joint venture, or if it's a founder that's launching something or an entrepreneur that has a business idea, that's going to create something that's going to solve the problem of other people.

[00:01:05] And you don't want to talk to people. Then you might as well just go get a job and work for someone else because it's never going to happen.

[00:01:12]Sam Kamani: [00:01:12] Hello, dreamers and action takers. Welcome to another episode of one money. Got money. I'm your host, Sam Kamani 

[00:01:21]Today I'm interviewing Scott, Aaron. He is a founder speaker sales and lead generation expert, author, and much more. In this episode he shares his experience of raising money for a not-for-profit venture and how human connection can be your superpower.  so let's get into it

[00:01:42]Sam Kamani: [00:01:42] welcome to the show. Scott had loved to know a bit more about you and  what you are up to these days.

[00:01:49] Yeah. 

[00:01:49] Scott Aaron: [00:01:49] So, thank you Sam, for having me and, currently, myself and my wife, we own and operate our own, consulting, coaching, and branding firm. there's the, the agency is called BYOB agency, but we have, sub companies underneath it called time to grow. And then I have my own, LinkedIn coaching program.

[00:02:09] That I work with individuals. So solopreneurs entrepreneurs multiprocessors, and even small, mid and large sized companies. I've done trainings for fidelity bank. I've done some trainings for some, 30 to $40 million a year revenue based companies. So. Basically, I teach human connection on LinkedIn.

[00:02:31]I'm also a three time all thrive and other a fourth book coming out soon, a top podcaster and just really living life by design right now. And that's what myself and my wife strive to do. Oh, 

[00:02:42] Sam Kamani: [00:02:42] that's fantastic. I would love to dwell more into the human connection side of things, because I do think that any tech founder that is listening to this podcast, but can benefit from that before we move on to that, would love to know a bit more about your history.

[00:02:59] Scott Aaron: [00:02:59] Yeah, I was in the health and wellness industry. I started, I've been an entrepreneur my whole life. I just turned 41 and I started in entrepreneurship when I was 18 going on 19 years old.

[00:03:10] My father also, an entrepreneur, made some bad business mistakes in a, a prior business when I was up. About 17, a senior year in high school that a year later as I was exiting my freshman year of college, he ended up getting sentenced to, 24 to 36 months in federal prison. And, he had made a pivot knowing his demise and he, bought.

[00:03:36] And was running, our first family owned fitness club. And I didn't know this, but that was going to be turned over to me after he went away. So at 18 and a half, almost 19, I became a business owner, whether I liked it or not. So the first 18 years of my career, Were spent in the, and the health and wellness industry.

[00:03:57] I did a personal training, sports, nutrition, group fitness. We own it operated three different health clubs. I did corporate wellness, corporate wellness programs. I started my own, I was the head. Yeah. And started a nonprofit charity. A five K run in a local nonprofit, but across the street from the gym, it was a, cemetery.

[00:04:21] So it was a non-for-profit cemetery that basically, owned and operated off a fundraising. And, I helped start something called the five K run, the rip five K runs. So rest in peace. So it was, around Halloween time here in the States that you would run at dusk, everyone would dress up in costume.

[00:04:37] And, that sounds like. Yeah. Yeah. I helped raise a lot of money and then got into online wellness in 2013. And that's kind of like when the doors opened up to me, where I saw that there was a bigger picture to impact more people. And I've been spending the last seven years, through multiple business ventures growing first, an online wellness business.

[00:05:01] And then within the last four years, launching my own, online coaching and consulting practice. And that's what I'm doing today. No, 

[00:05:08] Sam Kamani: [00:05:08] that is great. There is, yeah, there is so much to do relevant to that. one thing that I have seen talking with lots and lots of founders and entrepreneurs, one thing that they are really good at is selling.

[00:05:23] So, you know, you had to, whether it is your, not for profit. venture or your health and fitness business  or getting a lead through LinkedIn or whatever it might be,  most entrepreneurs over time get really, really good at selling their vision, selling their ideas, and just selling their product service, whatever it might be.

[00:05:43] What was the first thing that you ever sold? 

[00:05:48] Scott Aaron: [00:05:48] Wow. I think it was before he even, Was that the gym. I mean, I was going to say anything that I sold myself was probably gym memberships and then personal training packages. I mean, my, my wife tells me all the time I could sell snow to an Eskimo at this point.

[00:06:04] So there's nothing I can't sell if I, if I believe in something, if I get behind it, because just like you said, when I was, starting the five K run, you know, we needed sponsors. So I was literally going to local businesses and pitching, and you know, you know, you pay this amount of money. You're going to get on the banner.

[00:06:22] You're going to be in front of many, many people. So you, you have to pitch and you have to sell. And I love selling because. I sell without selling. So I focus on the aspect of connecting with people. So I always find out if there's a pain point or if there's a need that their business, you know, when someone comes into the gym, when I was selling memberships, you know, thanks for coming in today.

[00:06:45]what is it you're looking for in a gym? So when I asked that question, they tell me exactly what they're looking for. So where do you think I start the tour? Exactly. With what they want to see. So. You always ask questions to get to answers. And that's what I've always learned is that the more that you ask, the more that you'll GT you have to ask in order to get so.

[00:07:07] Whether it was selling gym memberships or personal trainer training packages. I started my own bootcamp and I was selling packages for them that selling online wellness programs, online supplements, my coaching, bro. All I do is sell without selling because. What I realized is that when you have something to offer the marketplace, that is going to help someone after they purchase it, you're not selling, you're connecting and offering them an opportunity to better something in their life.

[00:07:38] Sam Kamani: [00:07:38] That is such a good point. And , one thing that you touched on that is you solve. Problems for people, you are not really selling, but you are solving problems. And that's why it is like a mini pivot for every client that was coming to your health club or whatever online service you are doing, because you are finding out their need and then customizing your answer or your pitch.

[00:08:07] To meet that need. And that is so crucial. So going back to, you know, when you did your run and you've got, got funding for say like a, not for profit. Event. How did you start? Like, I, I talk with a lot of founders who work in this sort of a social good space, whether they want to work with underprivileged, communities, or they have seen something that is not working in, in the world or someone who doesn't, who is lacking things and they want to provide things for them, whether it is food or art or anything, it might be, And they will, they want to raise some funding for them or for their venture.

[00:08:47]that is going to bring a lot of social, good to the world. How should they even approach it? You know, where, how did you know where to start? How did you know who to go and reach out to? 

[00:08:59] Scott Aaron: [00:08:59] Well, I didn't because I had never done it before and sometimes you just have to figure it out, but the concept came about, so my gym, my last gym was directly across the street from.

[00:09:10]a cemetery called the Laurel Hill cemetery. It's actually one of the oldest cemeteries in the United States. a lot of there's some presidents and there's a lot of old, historical figures actually buried in this cemetery. And, so I would go and I would do runs because I didn't like running on the street.

[00:09:31] I wanted something a little bit different. So I, they would allow me to come in the cemetery and I would run up and down the paths. And I re I became good friends with the people that work there. And I said,  you know, I said, how do you guys, you know, do this? And they say, well, we, we do a lot of fundraising and we have balls and we have mixers.

[00:09:51] And we, and I said, have you guys ever thought about doing a run, like a five K, which is 3.1 kilometers or 3.1 miles, five, five kilometers. Yup. And, and I said, okay, it'd be really fun because I had a whole membership base of people that like to run, you know, why not just bring them across the street? And I said, you know, it's a cemetery.

[00:10:12] I said, why don't we do some sort of fall run based around Halloween where people can dress up in costume. And so we started brainstorming the idea and I had to get other people on board. So you, you learn from the mistakes. So. I ended up partnering with another nonprofit. I, I, I called a bunch of nonprofits in the area and I said, listen, I'm putting together a five K run.

[00:10:39] You know, we're looking for some other nonprofits to have a presence in the area to put their name on it, you know, are you interested? And I said, you're going to get X amount percent. Of the proceeds that are brought in to help your nonprofit. So I initially had three nonprofits, working together. So the cemetery themselves, and then a good friend of mine has a nonprofit called back on my feet where I was already doing work with them.

[00:11:07] So back on my feet is a nonprofit where, they help, women. That are coming out of drug rehabilitation to get reacclimated to life, but also to exercise. So they would come into the gym and they would borrow our fitness studio and they would do free classes for them to get them reacclimated. So I said, you know what, I'm already doing some work with them.

[00:11:30] I said, why not have them included so they can benefit as well. And I was good friends with the founder of the nonprofit. So they came on board. So we were going through an and again, I just like, like anything, you, you kind of put a program around it. What do we need? So we, we sat down, we brainstormed, we, we needed to come up with a logo.

[00:11:51] We needed to get a website we needed to get t-shirts. And then, you know, when we figured all that out, Then we started the fundraising, you know, what, what is it going to cost? How much money is it going to take us to get the tee shirts? And we basically started launching some campaigns. Now we also needed some draws.

[00:12:12] So, you know, there's a ton of runs in Philadelphia. So, you know, what were, what could we do? To entice people to want to come to this run? Well, one, it was a costume 5k in a cemetery, but then we were having an after party. So one of my employees was also in a band. So their band offered to play live music at the after party, where we did it at a, a farmer's market where there was free drink and free food.

[00:12:41] So it was a reason for people to come out. So the, the first year was, was absolutely a success. We, I think we raised close to $12,000 for, for the event, but yeah, it was a real bad experience with the one nonprofit. They did not show up to one board meeting. They didn't even show up on the day of the race to promote themselves.

[00:13:06] They didn't try to, so I dropped them and I said, you know what? Too many hands in the cookie jar. I said, let's just stick with the two nonprofits, the one that's hosting, and then the one that's helping cohost. Yeah. And every year, and I operated it and ran it for four years and then I basically stepped back and it was, it was running itself and I turned it over to them.

[00:13:30] But in the four years that I helped run it, we raised close to $150,000. And. It was, it was an amazing experience because then we started adding things local. breweries would come and they would donate kegs of beers of people would hang out and we had DJs and then we started doing contests. So we actually would have costume contest where there would be a best costume award.

[00:13:55] So I was emceeing it and it was just, it was a really great time. It was family friendly. People would run with strollers and their babies. They would bring their dogs. So when we started crazy enough the first year, I think we had around 40 or 50 runners by the fourth year, we had over 350 runners running in that race.

[00:14:20] And it got so big that we actually had to stagger the race. We had to have two separate runs going at the same time, because there were so many people and it was just an amazing thing to be a part of. 

[00:14:33]Sam Kamani: [00:14:33] that is really interesting that you managed to build something out of nothing and which is always scary for anyone new starting out.

[00:14:45] And,  going back to the human connection, what advice do you have  for say, a new founder or a new entrepreneur who wants to build that sort of connection and leverage the power of networks? Either it could be to get more customers, to get the right employees, to get attract and make those connections for the right investors.

[00:15:07] What advice do you have for 

[00:15:08] Scott Aaron: [00:15:08] them? You know, just be yourself, the number one business tool that we all have that no one's using is our ability to create connection with other people. Everyone's relying on automation and technology. When they're forgetting about the most valuable tool that you have, the number one sales tool that you have.

[00:15:28] Yep. It's yourself and too many people are trying to take themselves out of the equation, you know, myself and my, our business. 

[00:15:37] Sam Kamani: [00:15:37] Yes. While 

[00:15:38] Scott Aaron: [00:15:38] wildly successful. But we're still on the phone every single day with discovery calls and networking and podcasting, you know, she's upstairs in her office, I'm downstairs in mind.

[00:15:50] And then we meet in the middle of the end of the day. It never stops one or two because you know what? We love people. If you're in a business. That involves someone else to make a monetary decision decision, whether it's to an angel investor or whether it's a joint venture, or if it's a founder that's launching something or an entrepreneur that has a business idea, that's going to create something that's going to solve the problem of other people.

[00:16:16] And you don't want to talk to people. Then you might as well just go get a job and work for someone else because it's never going to happen. The fact is whether you like it or not. You have to get in the trenches and you have to stay in the trenches. As long as you can. I've seen so many businesses succeed and then fall flat on their face because once they started to get that taste of success, you know what they did, they took the foot off the gas, right?

[00:16:42] So no matter, no matter how many lives my, myself and my wife's company are impacting, no matter how much income and revenue our businesses are bringing in, it's never going to be enough. Because there's always going to be someone else to serve. So we're cutting constantly raising the bar of how can we continue to push ourselves forward.

[00:17:01] So the fact is, is that you need to decipher, you know, if you break down the sales process, so we're looking at the end result of something and the end result, whether you're an angel investor, a joint venture, whether you're running a nonprofit, if you're running a nonprofit, it's actually a for profit because you need money to actually run the nonprofit.

[00:17:18] So it's all the same thing. 

[00:17:20] Sam Kamani: [00:17:20] A hundred percent. I cannot agree more, 

[00:17:23] Scott Aaron: [00:17:23] but at the end of the day, there's a, there's a four step process to creating revenue and it starts with leads. If you don't have leads, if you don't have people to talk to you, can't get to the second step, which is conversations. When you get a lead, it leads to a conversation.

[00:17:41] Now conversations lead to the third step, which is conversions, which is what you need in your business. You need to convert those conversations into business, which leads you to the fourth step, which is revenue. I don't care. You can call your business a nonprofit. It's a nonprofit. But it needs profit to run the nonprofit.

[00:18:02] So no matter what the business looks like, no matter if it's a five Oh three C, if it's an LLC, if it's an escorp, if it's a partnership, every single one of those enterprises requires the same thing. You need money to make money, to run the business. And at the end of the day, the number one thing that's going to do that is your ability to create connection with other human beings.

[00:18:25] Sam Kamani: [00:18:25] That is so, so true. True. I mean, it's, I'm all for it, you know? Okay. Do automation. But at the end of the day, there is still making the decision. On the other side. It is not. It's still now. It's  it's only the very, very basic unnecessarily decisions are made by automation. if you still need to,  sign a corporate to your SAS product or, or even a small to medium business, there will be people on the other side signing those sort of, , decisions.

[00:18:58] So you need to have the ability to build that human connection and. One of the other thing that I learned just from talking with you today, it is ask, when you, when you build that connection, you can get to ask them, what is the, , what is their problem? What do they want to solve? So you can better cater to their needs.

[00:19:18] It is still very hard to do those sorts of things that automation are, or at least in my experience, 

[00:19:25] Scott Aaron: [00:19:25] I agree. 

[00:19:25] Sam Kamani: [00:19:25] Yeah, I've got one question for you, Scott, if you were say, starting today, you know, if your 18 year old now and you're starting from scratch, what would you do? What advice would you have for yourself?

[00:19:41] Scott Aaron: [00:19:41] Find out exactly and determine exactly who you want to serve. What I mean by that is too many people. When they're launching something they're casting too wide of a net. So an exercise that I, I, an exercise that I always walk my clients through is who is your avatar? And you know, people that are listening to this right now, you can do this too.

[00:20:04] If you're, if you're driving a car, keep both hands on the wheel. But if you're sitting and listening to this, grab a piece of paper, no matter what your business is, write down the person or the business title or the job title or the industry. That you need to plug into to get the desired result. So if I was to do this for myself, so I'm launching a coaching program, right.

[00:20:32] That, it helps, individuals, whatever it is. You know, who are the best people for me to talk to. So if I'm, if I'm launching a coaching program that helps, you know, people that are in corporate positions or mid level positions, you know, find their true passion in life. I would go on LinkedIn and I would search for mid level executive or corporate CEO, and I would start reaching out to them.

[00:20:56] The fact is. People don't get nichey enough with who they want to say. You can't serve everyone. I'm sorry. There's, there's a lot of people in this world, but to think that you are going to serve every single person, that's a great goal to have, but it's not a realistic goal because you have to serve that conglomerate of.

[00:21:17] Ideal people first that can lead to the masses of people. So I always tell people the quality leads into quantity. So I'm very specific about who I work with, who I want to work with. There's people, Sam, that I actually tell I'm not for you. I don't think that I could help you. I think you're looking for something else.

[00:21:41] I can refer you to someone, but I'm not the right coach for you because I don't want to help just anyone because my reputation as a coach is dependent upon the people that I choose to work with. So I make sure that I work with people that are coachable. So if someone is just starting a business, find out who your customer and client is.

[00:22:05] Don't just say, well, anyone that's 25 and older and news and business. That's too many people. You got to get you, you got to serve a very specific demographic first. So, you know, are they male or female? How old are they? What is their college education? If they have any, what kind of money they make in what industry are they in?

[00:22:24] What jobs have they had? What are they looking for? What problem are you solving for that person? So when you can outline that avatar for yourself, it's going to help you market yourself that much better when you are launching your business. 

[00:22:37] Sam Kamani: [00:22:37] Very very true. One of the example I give to people that I talk with as well, because I talk with lots of founders and that is that, you know, even Facebook, when it did start even right now, everyone uses it.

[00:22:49] A lot of people around the world use it. It was only for Harvard students are, you know, just one university campus. It wasn't even for all Ivy leagues or even Stanford or other, it didn't even include other community colleges or anything else. Just very, very. That's the fake Harvard students. They're just like in a three, four year range, that their age group, their demographic, they're all in a one very tiny geographic location, even though it's an online solution and even could use it anywhere, but it started that it solved the problem for them first, before going out and expanding from there onto other university campuses.

[00:23:28] So you are a hundred percent right? You're on the, on the money for that. Yep. So before we end. I have this sort of three quick fire questions. And that is, what is the book you are reading or what is one book that you recommend to them? 

[00:23:43]Scott Aaron: [00:23:43] go for no, by Andrea waltz and Richard Fenton, go get the original, get the original it's on the title.

[00:23:52] It says yes is the destination, but no is how you're going to get there. So when you're in fundraising, when you're a nonprofit, when you're in a venture capitalist, and you're asking someone for money, you're asking for an exchange, a monetary exchange, you're going to be told no 30 times more than you will.

[00:24:11] Yes. So when you can fall in love with the word, no, the yeses will start showing up. So for me, I teach my clients to have no goals. Not, not like no goals. Like the word N O how many no's do you want to have every week? So I know what my, no quotion is. If, if I, if I have 25 calls in a week, I know one out of every five phone calls, I'm going to close a new client.

[00:24:38] So I know that's five new clients a week. So the fact is people are throwing darts at a dartboard with their eyes closed. This book is unbelievable. It's 75 pages. It will fire you up and it will realize it will help you emotionally detached from the word no fall in love with it. And the yeses will start showing up.

[00:25:00] Sam Kamani: [00:25:00] Beautiful. Absolutely beautiful advice. No wonder you are at the top of your game. Really good advice. Number two. And that is, is there a podcast that you recommend or that you listen to regularly? 

[00:25:17]Scott Aaron: [00:25:17] for the love of money, by Chris harder, he's a mentor and friend of mine. unbelievable. You know, he says when, when, when good people.

[00:25:26] Make good money. They do great things. And he's making you unapologetic for wanting to have monetary success. And he does, you know, solo episodes. He does Juul episodes with his amazing wife, Lori, or he interviews other seven, eight, and nine figure income earners, some billionaires too, about what they've done to succeed.

[00:25:48] So I highly highly recommend that podcast. 

[00:25:52] Sam Kamani: [00:25:52] Absolutely. That's great. I will put the link in underneath and the description everywhere this goes. And the last question is if, money, time, resources were of no issue, you had unlimited time, money, resources, what would you build? What would you work on?

[00:26:11]Scott Aaron: [00:26:11] I mean,  my big dream. is to have a, a beach front house by the New Jersey shore where it's, there's a big open kitchen and a panoramic view of the Atlantic ocean, where my family can go and get away. 

[00:26:29] Sam Kamani: [00:26:29] That's great. That is really good.

[00:26:32]finally, if people want to connect with you, reach out to you, what's the best, is it your LinkedIn or? 

[00:26:40] Scott Aaron: [00:26:40] Yeah, I have a website. So it's www dot Scott, aaron.net. Or you can find me on social media. You can just search Scott inner and on LinkedIn and Facebook I'll come right up. And if you are on Instagram, my handle is at Scott.

[00:26:52] Enter in LinkedIn. 

[00:26:54] Sam Kamani: [00:26:54] Fantastic. That's great. It's been a pleasure to talk with you and learn more and learn quite a few more things about, you know, selling, getting no, to get to. Yes. And yeah. And everything in between. Thank you again for your time, Scott. 

[00:27:10] Scott Aaron: [00:27:10] Thank you, Sam honor. And a pleasure to be here today.