Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani

13: How to avoid burnout as a Startup Founder with Guest - Ben Ivey

August 29, 2020 Ben Ivey, Sam Kamani
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
13: How to avoid burnout as a Startup Founder with Guest - Ben Ivey
Chapters
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
13: How to avoid burnout as a Startup Founder with Guest - Ben Ivey
Aug 29, 2020
Ben Ivey, Sam Kamani

Are you an entrepreneur struggling with stress?

  • How to stop your startup from affecting your mental health?
  • What steps can you take to avoid burnout?
  • Can you improve your creativity and productivity by working less?

These are some of the questions that Ben answers in this podcast. 

My guest this episode is Ben Ivey, Ben is an entrepreneur, coach, mentor and speaker who works with startups as well as corporates.

Ben has worked with Coca Cola, HSBC and Maersk to inspire their teams and help them boost business success. He has also completed a TED talk in Mandarin Chinese:

Here are some other highlights from this episode

  • Overcoming negativity
  • Optimising your morning routine
  • How to spark creativity
  • Best way to practise gratitude
  • How to avoid burnout
  • Improving creativity
  • How to condition your identity.

Here are some of the links from the episode:- 

https://www.ben-ivey.com/

Book recommendation:-

https://howtopivot.co/

https://www.amazon.com/Power-Now-Guide-Spiritual-Enlightenment/dp/1577314808

Podcast recommendation:-

https://www.discoveryourtalentpodcast.com/podcast/

Please connect with Ben Ivey via Linkedin or email him directly at: hello@ben-ivey.com

Connect with Ben in China wechat: benivey

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

Show Notes Transcript

Are you an entrepreneur struggling with stress?

  • How to stop your startup from affecting your mental health?
  • What steps can you take to avoid burnout?
  • Can you improve your creativity and productivity by working less?

These are some of the questions that Ben answers in this podcast. 

My guest this episode is Ben Ivey, Ben is an entrepreneur, coach, mentor and speaker who works with startups as well as corporates.

Ben has worked with Coca Cola, HSBC and Maersk to inspire their teams and help them boost business success. He has also completed a TED talk in Mandarin Chinese:

Here are some other highlights from this episode

  • Overcoming negativity
  • Optimising your morning routine
  • How to spark creativity
  • Best way to practise gratitude
  • How to avoid burnout
  • Improving creativity
  • How to condition your identity.

Here are some of the links from the episode:- 

https://www.ben-ivey.com/

Book recommendation:-

https://howtopivot.co/

https://www.amazon.com/Power-Now-Guide-Spiritual-Enlightenment/dp/1577314808

Podcast recommendation:-

https://www.discoveryourtalentpodcast.com/podcast/

Please connect with Ben Ivey via Linkedin or email him directly at: hello@ben-ivey.com

Connect with Ben in China wechat: benivey

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

Ben Ivey: [00:00:00] Yeah, I think the most important thing to be aware of is the fact that we're in a stage of a lot of uncertainty right now there's many business owners who are scared, they're confused, and that attempting to work out what it is that they want to do with their lives.

[00:00:16] And one of the concepts that I think is incredibly important to understand is the one I have this, then I will addiction. what I mean by that is that very often founders will say, yeah, when I have a successful startup, then I'll get a relationship. When I have my first, funding, then I will look after my health.

[00:00:36] And what often happens that I see is startup founders and those in entrepreneurship end up sacrificing everything that they can most about along the journey. what I challenged them to do is actually to flip it on its head and to think what could you put in place such as business boundaries so that you can actually enjoy the journey?

[00:00:58]Sam Kamani: [00:00:58] Hello, dreamers and action takers. Welcom to another episode of want money got money. I'm your host, Sam Kamani.

[00:01:07]My guest today is Ben Ivy, who is originally from UK, but he has worked in places like China and Silicon Valley.  Today, he's going to share all about the mental health challenges that most young entrepreneurs and founders go through. 

[00:01:24]He is also going to share how he overcame his own mental health challenges fatigue and burnout

[00:01:31] I think this episode is a must listen for anyone who is struggling from too much stress or too much uncertainty at the present time and is also feeling fatigued from the hustle culture. 

[00:01:45] Sam Kamani: [00:01:45] so having said that, welcome to the show, Ben it's great to have you here would love to know a bit about your background and how you got started in entrepreneurship. 

[00:01:57] Ben Ivey: [00:01:57] Sure. So I think that. I have always been somewhat entrepreneurial. even at school, they joined something called young enterprise. We sold pajamas and school.

[00:02:06] And then when I was in university, I started importing and exporting sports bags and selling them around the UK. And then I started with an app. We are based in Silicon Valley, helping people memorize through virtual reality. So we always had this entrepreneurial spirit and along the journey, I really wanted to be able to inspire people similar to yourself to do the same.

[00:02:32] However, I had a, moment in my life that was incredibly life changing and that's where I lost my father to suicide. And that completely shifted my perspective on entrepreneurship, why I was doing what I was doing. And I ended up cutting that business and Silicon Valley to search about why do these things happen for entrepreneurs and how come we.

[00:02:57] Can have these parallel worlds. One which people see and one which we actually, yeah. So I saw my dad the day before best friends and it really shook my world. So I really went on a thirst for knowledge and became obsessed with how do people get to that state? So I started to attend different events. I traveled the world.

[00:03:18] I spend time in China. I started to learn from all these different experts in gears about the mind and to figure out what happened. And also, how do you live a really fulfilled life? Because clearly there was something that my dad was missing and I didn't want to go down a road that could lead me down a similar path.

[00:03:36] So on that journey, I started to inspire people in China. I was doing one of these startup. It does, I was attempting to help as many people as possible as a coach. And then I started to yeah. Really resonate. Yeah. With entrepreneurs. And I started to go set up a business where I was helping stressed and overwhelmed entrepreneurs.

[00:03:57] Ultimately. Live a great lifestyle whilst they build that business. So they don't have that overwhelm that stress that burnout so they can really enjoy the journey. And then as part of that, I also had people come up to me asking if they could do what I do. And I said, no, 

[00:04:14] Sam Kamani: [00:04:14] but then, 

[00:04:15] Ben Ivey: [00:04:15] yeah, a few months later I get back to them and I was like, yeah, I can start to teach you, but give me a better time.

[00:04:19] I want to make sure that I give you all the correct skills because I've been on literally hundreds of different courses. And I don't want to. Take someone under my wing, who I can't make outstanding at what they do. So then I think four years ago, I started certifying people as lifestyle coaches and helping them gain the skills to impact others.

[00:04:39] And then also built up a business online. That 

[00:04:42] Sam Kamani: [00:04:42] is great. That is really inspirational. There is so much to unpack in there. get into it. currently this is your main thing that this is where you train people  How to be better at looking after their mental health? 

[00:05:02] Ben Ivey: [00:05:02] correct?

[00:05:03] The way that I phrase it is I help entrepreneurs who are stressed and overwhelmed to live about a lifestyle whilst then boosts their business success. So really for me, it's understanding how do I make an entrepreneur incredibly productive, sustainably, so they can consistently achieve the results that they desire in their life.

[00:05:22] Yeah. 

[00:05:23] Sam Kamani: [00:05:23] Yeah. That is. So good. And it is so timely because trust me for most tech startup founders, it is a very lonely journey. And so many of them suffer from so much stress. That they put on themselves, especially if they are solo founders, they put, they carry all that weight on their shoulders. before we even go into any of the funding and all those sort of things, I would love to get some strategies or what advice would you have to all these founders and entrepreneurs going through that stress?

[00:06:03] Especially in times like these where, finances are tight and there's all sorts of pressures. 

[00:06:10] Ben Ivey: [00:06:10] Yeah, I think the most important thing to be aware of is the fact that we're in a stage of a lot of uncertainty right now there's many business owners who are scared, they're confused, and that attempting to work out what it is that they want to do with their lives.

[00:06:26] And one of the concepts that I think is incredibly important to understand is the one I have this, then I will addiction. what I mean by that is that very often founders will say, yeah, when I have a successful startup, then I'll get a relationship. When I have my first, funding, then I will look after my health.

[00:06:47] And what often happens that I see is startup founders and those in entrepreneurship end up sacrificing everything that they can most about along the journey. what I challenged them to do is actually to flip it on its head and to think what could you put in place such as business boundaries so that you can actually enjoy the journey?

[00:07:08] Because what happens is a little entrepreneurs get tunnel vision. And although that is fantastic, it actually stops your business growth because you can't think creatively in a different way. I'll give you an example. So I had a guy come to me two years ago. his name's Alex and he has a software company.

[00:07:26] So he's building software for other people, actually, some other, very much what you're doing now. And he had a team of 12 and when he came to me, he was working 16 hour, 16 hour days, seven days a week. And he was completely burning out. And he was losing money each month. And he was saying, yeah, Ben, I need help with marketing.

[00:07:43] I need more clients. And then the first five minutes I figured out, marketing is not what this guy needs. The biggest challenge has. And I think that a lot of techie people who do coding struggle with this is actually perfectionism. Because everything needs to be correct in code because you're fixing bugs.

[00:07:58] And that makes sense in that area. But when you apply that to marketing it or apply it to other areas where you need to take those risks and everything, can't be perfect. Cause you don't know all those variables. It has a huge detrimental impact. And what happens is he ended up cutting his team down by 70%.

[00:08:17] So he had four people and he ended up. 10 acts in his business that year, which was unreal. So that just goes to show the importance of gaining that perspective and starting to give yourself the space to be able to do things different. That 

[00:08:34] Sam Kamani: [00:08:34] is such good insight that, sometimes, yeah. You should not only focus on working in the business, but you should work on the business.

[00:08:44] And when he worked on business talking about Alex and that's where he could, Tenex his business while reducing his workload. So that is really good. But yeah. Then, it's like when you are an entrepreneurial and founder, you are being pulled from so many different directions. There is Oh, okay.

[00:09:03] Yeah. Especially if you are like even the CEO of the company and founder yourself, and then you have to, Oh, you need to do the accounts or no, you need to do worry about marketing. You need to do about HR. You need to do about worry about the product and regulation. Like every direction you feel like you're being stretched.

[00:09:21] So how, what strategy. Do you have for like someone who's feeling overwhelmed that, feel like it's a never ending to do list. 

[00:09:31] Ben Ivey: [00:09:31] Yeah. the truth is as an entrepreneur, it is a never ending to do this, The list is never going to get done. So the question is knowing that the list is never going to get done.

[00:09:41] Can you actually put less pressure on yourself? Because the truth is as an entrepreneur, we overestimate what we can do in a year. But we underestimate what we can do in a decade. And very often it's actually ourselves, but these are goals. And this criteria that we have to do these certain things, which causes us to be stressed.

[00:10:00] So very often what I posted entrepreneurs. And if I think about my journey, when I was in Silicon Valley, I was. Honestly working, every single day I'd see people take a day off and I think they were lazy. I have to be possibly take a day off and I genuinely had that mindset so I can really speak and understand where people come from.

[00:10:18] But what I've found is that by giving myself. The ability of having a full day off, being able to read it charge, what happens is I can continually and sustainably build a business and that's, that works as opposed to burning out in the process. And especially when we're overwhelmed, what's happening is we're trying to take on loads at the same time.

[00:10:38] One of the things that I do now, for example, As I said, powering years. So this is every three months. I set a major strategy for those three months. And then I set a few minors as well. And this allows me to have a clear focus as opposed to getting overwhelmed by attempting to do 18 different things at the same time.

[00:10:58] And that helps me to have a clear focus and actually make much more progress in an area than to become overwhelmed, attempting to stretch myself too thin in many different directions. 

[00:11:09] Sam Kamani: [00:11:09] Yep. that is a excellent strategy. So how does this, these three months work or what sort of structure do you have?

[00:11:18] So when do you do that? Do you do that at the start of the year? Is there any. Formula that you have for 

[00:11:24] Ben Ivey: [00:11:24] that? sure. So the structure is pretty, it's simple at the beginning of the year. Most people set a calendar yet. Like I'm going to set a year ago. This is what I will achieve. And I speak to people and very often that goal shifts that go changes.

[00:11:36] And I'll give you a great example. Okay. This year, most entrepreneurs are incredibly stressed this year because the goal they set at the beginning of the year, It's very different to perhaps where they are at the moment, because COVID hit right? You got different things that happen. And for entrepreneurs, your ability to pivot is incredibly important.

[00:11:56] And by setting these three months, Targets and goals. And I do them every three months. So I finished in March and then I sat in new ones for April, may and June. What happens is that allows me to have a clear focus. So for example, let's say you're a founder and you realize, okay, what I need to do is get an MVP.

[00:12:11]that is the most important thing, like yes is marketing. This is other things, but MVP is the focus. And you say for three months, we're going to hone down on MVP. Yes, we'll do some marketing. Yes. Will be that, but that is the overarching theme and the goal for us to focus on. And what I find is that people make so much progress in a relatively short period of time because they have that focus as opposed to saying in 12 months, or in six months, I want to do this.

[00:12:36] And that enables people to really hone in and focus on what they're doing each day. And then I also add in something which I like, which a weekly evaluations. this is honestly one of my favorite habits. And basically this is every week you reflect and you ask yourself a series of questions to figure out if you're on track, it's saying, how have I worked on my MVP and ha what am I going to do next week?

[00:12:59] It's how could, how could this week have been better and what will I do next week to make it even more sensational? And you start to have these habits that you put in place that accumulate over time that enable you to become an outstanding entrepreneur know, one small habit that I think is incredibly important is gratitude.

[00:13:19] I think that as entrepreneurs, the reason we feel pressure is because we have so many expectations of what we want to achieve and what we expect for ourselves. If we can trade those expectations for gratitude, what happens is. We can live in a more like a place of abundance where we see how lucky we are right now, as opposed to being the stress ball and pressure that it is to be an entrepreneur.

[00:13:44] Sam Kamani: [00:13:44] Yup. very true. 

[00:13:46]

[00:13:46] Do you use, I know there's lots of things out there for gravity. Do you use any tools, any apps? Do you just note down things in a diary? What do you do? 

[00:13:57] Ben Ivey: [00:13:57] Sure. Say for me, grand street is pretty simple. Gratitude only works when you actually feel it. So that's some people that write things down, young grateful for the sun, the bricks.

[00:14:07] Yeah. Ruth, blah, blah, blah. And they don't feel it. So it has. Very little impact. Instead for me, I go on a walk or I have a rebounder next to me, which has a mini trampoline and I jump up and down on it and I think, what can I truly be grateful for right now? And I think that the little things, and they do it every morning and what that does is it resets me and it puts me in the right state because.

[00:14:31] We wake up and if you're an entrepreneur, the first thing you do is work. I'd really challenge you to move away from that because what's happening is you're dealing immediately with issues and stress, right? Instead I say this right, as an entrepreneur, if you can build your emotional capacity up so you can deal with more things.

[00:14:49] You will get more stuff done in a day, and I'm sure you've had this well as an entrepreneur and you're not being and productive. Like I'm feeling tired. you're wearing out. You're just slowly working your way through. Whereas for example, if you afresh knock that out easily. So really it's about building up that capacity.

[00:15:04] So yeah, we're in the right emotional state and you have that energy. The tackle a task and really get it done. So for me, yeah, it's just gratitude, closing my eyes and actually feeling what's going on. I have some people that write it down. I have other people that reflect, but for me, closing my eyes and reflecting is one of the best things.

[00:15:22] That 

[00:15:22] Sam Kamani: [00:15:22] is really good advice. I'm sorry to ask you so many questions around this aspect of, that this is the first thing you do. for a lot of people, especially in tech. I know that, and even not so much in tech these days, the first thing people do is they pick up their phone, right? They check their emails and immediately the stress levels are high because there are inquiries.

[00:15:49] There are things that you had to do. You get reminded, you have requests in your emails that come in. And then second thing people do is look at the news that the world is even more divided than it was yesterday. And then the topic. It do is look at the social media, where everyone else is living the life of their dream or most people are.

[00:16:10] And 

[00:16:10] Ben Ivey: [00:16:10] you're not, let me start over. 

[00:16:12] Sam Kamani: [00:16:12] it's and to go from that, to going to closing your eyes and doing gratitude, it is, I know it has. Really good longterm benefits, but it is very hard initially to break that habit of, as soon as you wake up to not pick up your phone, did you never have that habit or did you have to overcome it or 

[00:16:33]Ben Ivey: [00:16:33] that's a fantastic thing.

[00:16:34] So for me, I did have that happen. I think everyone does. I think phones are incredibly addictive, especially when it's your loss. So I'm embarking. I wake up at 10. I look at BBC, I look at the news and then what really struck me. And this was, probably about five years ago. It was when I opened it up. And, I have clients that have sometimes suicidal.

[00:16:53] They're so stressed out that on the edge. And the first thing I wake up to is someone with a depressed tax. I Ben, I'm not sure if I can do this, blah, blah, blah, just taking them on as a client. And they're feeling incredibly stressed. Now when I wake up. And the first thing I read is something like that.

[00:17:09] And obviously I want to help, but it's 5:00 AM. Yeah. The only other side of the world. And suddenly I am experienced, I'm saying that this negativity and I have to be able to control that for me. I was like, this is not how I want to start my day. And I look at the news and everything is always going wrong.

[00:17:25]do I really want to do that? So I came up with the decision then and there that I would have. Time for myself before I started to take on other people's shit. So it was very simple. And it's this it's that I through the habit that the first hour and a half to almost two hours, I will not spend time looking at my phone, doing different things.

[00:17:48] I want to be able to be a human because the truth is that for many people, their phone controls that. When it vibrates, you look at it when it calls you look at it and instead it's switching it all. It's on its head. And for me, one of the best things to do is to move my phone away. So most people have it next to their bed.

[00:18:08] Okay. So what I do is I put it on the other side of the room. It wakes me up. I have water, I have a shower. And then I go downstairs where it doesn't distract me. And for example, you have preparing for this going in the morning, like I'm checking my phone. So it's. It's an ability to be able to have that discipline.

[00:18:23] And as an entrepreneur, you are disciplined, but this is understanding, how will this actually be beneficial to me? So what I challenge people to do is to do it for a week. Okay. If you don't like it. Okay. My guess is you will feel so much clearer for so much more relaxed that you'll be able to get.

[00:18:41] Like so much more done in your day because you're staffing it in the right way. You're not immediately being bombarded with all these issues, but instead you'll bring it and yourself up. You're visualizing, maybe you're doing some exercise and you're getting the endorphins running. So when you start the day, you're in gear five, as opposed to just getting out the starting blocks.

[00:19:01] Sam Kamani: [00:19:01] Yeah. Very true. Good love to know a bit more about your day. I know you've been up like at 7:00 AM there and you've been up for two hours. So what do you do? You wake up at five? 

[00:19:13] Ben Ivey: [00:19:13] Sure. So there's basically a few different routines that I've played around with. Okay. So usually I would wake up at five. I would.

[00:19:24]exercise on what accounts then I'll stretch and then I'll do my routine and then I'll start my day. So for me really, that's the standard one. Now at the moment I do something a little bit different. Yeah. And that I exercise in the afternoon because with COVID going, I can't really get out the house as much.

[00:19:41] So I find that's a great, great way to relax in between. So very simply for me. it's a simple routine. I wake up and then I have an incredibly large water bottle and I hate

[00:19:54]It's a drink as much of it as possible because when you sleep, you're incredibly dehydrated. So most entrepreneurs, when you wake up feeling like crap and you're tired, it's actually not that you're tired. It's that? You're dehydrated. what you do is if you drink 500 milliliters of water straight away, it immediately hydrates you.

[00:20:10] And it's an energy boost. I remember sharing this with entrepreneurs in the U S and he said, Ben, it is like magic. I don't know why I haven't done this my whole life. So I drink water immediately. Yeah. And then I have a freezing cold shower and believe me, that wakes me up very quickly. And then I start around my routine.

[00:20:26] So the first thing I do is stretch and I do stretching for about half an hour. And that enables me to. Get into the right state, because for me personally, when I'm on my laptop all day and I've got standing desk, I move around. But yeah, for me, I found the body pain. Impacts my productivity when I'm stressed or my shoulder hurts or when my hips hurt.

[00:20:47] So for me, stretching in the morning allows me to get in the right state so that I'm then ready to move forward for the day. And then I do about half an hour of getting myself in the right state. So this is gratitude, something called conditioning, your identity. What I mean by that is thinking about the person who you must become in the future in order to live the life you desire and thinking about that now.

[00:21:10] So in different areas of my life, I think I want to be an ultimate spot and warrior for my health. I want to be a business chief extraordinary, and I start to think of those elements. I think in my values, I think what's most important to me. And then I go into gratitude. I imagine energy coming in and out, and then ultimately.

[00:21:29] I start to visualize what I want to create in my life. And once you've gone through that hour routine, like then I am ready to rock and roll. Like for me, that time in the morning allows me to move forward. And then usually I'll spend time with my wife. I'll connect, yeah, I'm up before she does. She usually sleeps an extra two hours.

[00:21:47] That's how she does it. Not for me. And then I connected with her. We have breakfast and then I start my day and that is an amazing routine that has allowed me to. Feeling incredibly grounded as I built my business. And as I take on different projects. Yep. 

[00:22:04] Sam Kamani: [00:22:04] That is, yeah, it is. It's always interesting for me to learn other people's routine.

[00:22:11] Have you always had that routine or are, what was your routine like when you were working in Bay area in San Francisco or, in the Bay area, I'd 

[00:22:21] Ben Ivey: [00:22:21] wake up and I'd work. I know it was walking until basically I couldn't walk anymore. And then I pass out. Like it was when I look back, it was such a very challenging period.

[00:22:31] And I, if I'm, for example, a moment in my life where I've burnt out for six weeks and I've never been burnt out before, and it was such a weird feeling of waking up and. Just feeling so incredibly tired. And what happens is that happens over a period of time and your productivity decreases. Like you start to burn out.

[00:22:49] You're not looking after yourself properly. And this is where I realized by prioritizing myself now. Wow. That enables me to actually have the things that I care about most as I build the business. And it helps me thrive so much more than just constantly being tunnel visioned on one thing. Yep. 

[00:23:08] Sam Kamani: [00:23:08] That's great.

[00:23:09] I would like to move on to all the, all these different businesses you have built and some of them all by yourself. did you ever need it to raise funding or how did you stop? 

[00:23:23] Ben Ivey: [00:23:23] Sure. I had small funding, from the university, when I was born in the back business just as an initial injection, otherwise it has mainly been bootstrapped, in order to build it up.

[00:23:34] And for me, I think that's the best way. And if you can get that revenue in early, and obviously that depends on the product that you're building. I think that's one of the best ways to make it very sustainable. I think that. A lot of businesses spend too much time on building something. That's perfect.

[00:23:51] I think one of your recent episodes of saying that just won't happen, right? Yeah. Yeah. It's so true. And it's incredibly important to figure out what the customer wants and create it for them and have them join you on that journey. Yeah. 

[00:24:08] Sam Kamani: [00:24:08] No, that's great. what was the first thing you ever sold?

[00:24:14] Ben Ivey: [00:24:14] The first thing I ever sold, I think it was actually chocolate when I was younger. I think I was about 13 or 14. I remember thinking that I could undercut. They shop at school and I can buy in bulk and people would come to me and then I could sell the chocolate bars. I used to buy these things called Freddo and at the tuck shop, they used to sell them for 10 pay.

[00:24:38] And I was under the dishes on the 20 pay. And I was like, I could sell them at 15 pay and I could meet myself. Five P profit. Cause they only cost 10 bucks. I don't remember signing to sell that. I'd sell Lucas. They don't sell crisps. I used to sell a lot of things and then unfortunately got shut down with a teacher when I looked in those there's loads of pound coins and this chocolate in my I covered at school.

[00:25:00] So that was probably one of the best things that I saw, which is a pretty fun venture. That 

[00:25:05] Sam Kamani: [00:25:05] is the sign up for true entrepreneur. How did I'm just looking at all your history and you've done so much work in the whole area of mental health and 

[00:25:17]

[00:25:17] overcoming hardship and all sorts of things.

[00:25:21]how did you. Okay. This niche of entrepreneurs, what made you choose that? Okay. I'm going to go and help entrepreneurs who? 

[00:25:30] Ben Ivey: [00:25:30] Sure. for me, I think that when we look into an entrepreneur, really, I think it's someone that does something different to other people. And the truth is that I get a lot of entrepreneurs that messaged me.

[00:25:40] I also get people who are in the corporate career, who are looking to venture out, or they're looking to do things differently, or they're not happy with where they are. And I think that ultimately for me, I find it fascinating working with people who have such big visions and they want to achieve such great things.

[00:25:55] And if I can support them, do that in a way that's more sustainable, where they can get greater results and look at them after themselves in the process and live a great lifestyle. Like for me, that is an incredible gift to be able to give someone the ability to live their life to the fullest, whilst they're on the entrepreneurial journey and not wait until they have success to start living life.

[00:26:19] Yep. 

[00:26:20] Sam Kamani: [00:26:20] That's true. You also mentioned at one stage, you have done some work in. In China as well. So what's that venture? 

[00:26:30]Ben Ivey: [00:26:30] as I started, it's a build my business. I ended up being in a long distance relationship. So she's now my wife, but at the time she was living in Los Angeles, I was doing business in China.

[00:26:41] And then I'm also from the UK. So I travel home. So what happened was I ended up living this life of basically being a digital nomad of working from all these different places. And the reason that China was. So paramount is the, it was there that I started to build up my coaching business and stuff to help people in China who are overwhelmed, putting a lot of pressure on themselves.

[00:27:03] I think, especially in Asia, that's incredibly common. So as I started to speak there, I started to engage in more people. And now I have a fantastic network out there. I've done a. Ted talk in Chinese. I've been able to have a huge impact on there. And every year, apart from this year, I fly there. I do talks.

[00:27:21] I do speaking gigs around different places to be able to give back. Yep. 

[00:27:26] Sam Kamani: [00:27:26] Oh, that's great. I am interviewing another French entrepreneur in two days time, who is, who has, who's just, vent with his Korean girlfriend and thought again, we're going to build a business here, build a life here. And then he has a very successful business.

[00:27:44] And. Lots of events and does all sorts of cool things. And it's amazing what some people manage to achieve, despite all the cultural barriers.  Do you speak Mandarin? 

[00:27:57]Ben Ivey: [00:27:57] yeah, I do. I don't speak it fluently, but I can get by in Mandarin pretty easily. 

[00:28:03] Sam Kamani: [00:28:03] Oh, that's great. Where did you learn? Did they learn in UK or us?

[00:28:07] Sure. Also 

[00:28:08] Ben Ivey: [00:28:08] I did economics and Mandarin at university, but I have to say that I think my Mandarin was incredibly poor there. And then as I started to go to China more and more, I started to pick it up and then I got to an intermediate level and then I really gave myself a challenge last year of. Doing the TEDx in Chinese, I'd never done a Chinese speech before, so you can only imagine it was like I'm on a TEDx stage.

[00:28:33] And I know I've learned the entire speech off by heart. Okay. Now for me, that was incredibly challenging swimming in a pool, reciting my speech as I was going through it. it was an incredible experience. And. To be able to do that. Definitely pushed my Chinese to another level. Am I speaking? Because I remember I speak Chinese and then I do language after and it would just look very strange.

[00:28:58] So I was, I've been incredibly fortunate that they managed to do that and to give back, in Chinese. Cause I really wanted them to feel impacted with me using the local language. 

[00:29:10] Sam Kamani: [00:29:10] Oh, fantastic. No, that is good. Can absolutely see the impact you would have because of the effort that you have gone to.

[00:29:18] And people recognize that, especially in China, that's what I felt like doing business there and even learning a little bit, and that goes a long way. It shows your effort. So that is great. So 

[00:29:32] Ben Ivey: [00:29:32] what's 

[00:29:32] Sam Kamani: [00:29:32] next what's you talked about planning and so where do you see yourself in say five years time?

[00:29:38] What's the plan? 

[00:29:40]Ben Ivey: [00:29:40] for me, five years is pretty simple. I, once you keep expanding my impact internationally and in China, So similar to yourself, I've Oh, cost that I'm launching the entrepreneurial lifestyle, where I'm interviewing different entrepreneurs about how do you live a great lifestyle whilst you brought up your business and looking into strategies to help people with that.

[00:30:00] So they can gain a variety of perspectives and people that have multi million dollar companies, billion dollar companies, all the way to start ups who are perhaps moving forward. And I think that'll help inspire people as to what is possible. And then for myself, I want to, have a huge impact, in Chinese and China as well.

[00:30:20] And I want to be able to have it even more trainers that I'm certifying and they're coming through to be able to have a bigger impact because there's so much I can do myself and I'd love to be able to have even more people that I can train in where I can have an impact on a much wider audience. Yep.

[00:30:38]Sam Kamani: [00:30:38] there's one thing that I do ask all guests on my podcast. And that is what is your ask? How can any audience, next with you or help you, or what are you looking for? I'm looking for teens funding. What? Yes. 

[00:30:55] Ben Ivey: [00:30:55] Sure. Not even funny. I'm good for me. It's for really, opportunities to have a bigger impact.

[00:31:02] So if there's a place where I can speak, if there's a podcast, I can be on. If there's a place that I can share for me, I want to spread the impact, especially during this period. So if anyone knows, any organizations or people to connect with, I'm more than happy to have a conversation. 

[00:31:17] Sam Kamani: [00:31:17] Yep. That is great.

[00:31:20]since you deal in so much to do with resilience and mental health and all that, what advice do you have for someone going through for an entrepreneur going through a really difficult time at the moment?  

[00:31:36] Ben Ivey: [00:31:36] I think ultimately. When I think about the position that we're in now, especially for entrepreneurs, I think it's incredibly important now more than ever to authentically connect with other entrepreneurs. What I mean by that is that if you're asking right Japan, how has going almost every entrepreneur will say the same thing.

[00:31:55] Amazing. It's going great. And then you ask them, how's it really going? tell me what's actually going on. And if you have the ability to be vulnerable and courageous and say, look, it's going well, but we're struggling with marketing this yet. I can't find the right channel and it's stressing me out.

[00:32:10] And my family is stressing me out. And if you can have that conversation with another human on a human 

[00:32:16] Sam Kamani: [00:32:16] level 

[00:32:17] Ben Ivey: [00:32:17] enables you to connect. I think as entrepreneurs, it's easy to isolate yourself. If you can actually connect with other entrepreneurs. And I think it's very important. I connect with people monthly.

[00:32:27] I want you bananas all over the world because it gives me a perspective and an ability to connect and have those conversations that we often don't get. And the other one that I'd say is that if you've got. A partner, a girlfriend, a boyfriend. Do you have someone to lean on, actually lean on them and share what's going on?

[00:32:46] It's easy to bottle everything up. If you can share actually what's happening. I had a shit day today or today was great. I'm starting to move forward and you can have those. Conversations. It really enables you to offer loaned a lot of baggage that we store as entrepreneurs. And the last thing I'd say is chill out.

[00:33:05] I think it's so important for entrepreneurs to just relax and go have fun. go play mini golf, go have a drink in a bog, chill out with friends. And I think it's so important to stay or have some sort of connection with other people so that we don't have. a world where we're all isolated, goading, our own businesses.

[00:33:28] That is a 

[00:33:29] Sam Kamani: [00:33:29] hundred percent true. Is there any book that you are reading right now or you recommend. 

[00:33:37] Ben Ivey: [00:33:37] Sure. So whenever I got the question, are there any books that I can recommend? I think that for me, I've needed different books at different times in my life. And I think that there is no one book that stands out for me as this is the book to go to as the most outstanding book.

[00:33:53]I'm sure, one of your books that, for example, on the Corona, I think that's. Business and the Corona. I think that'd be a great book too, to get for a lot of people during this period. But I guess for me, when I think about the situation that a lot of people are in right now, I think that looking into the power of now by our cut toe, I think looking into the Alchemist, I think those books are very important so that you can see the life's journey.

[00:34:20] I think very often it's easy to. We've spoken about this, quite a lot during this conversation about this inward pressure we put on ourselves. And I think that if you can see there's a light at the end of the tunnel, like you don't have to run, you can have patients, for me, it's that patience that I think is the critical scale.

[00:34:40] That if you have allows you to stand out and become much more sustainable, as opposed to this instant gratification, so use doing the wealth that we've become accustomed to. Yup. 

[00:34:54] Sam Kamani: [00:34:54] Second, is there a podcast that you'd recommend? 

[00:34:58] Ben Ivey: [00:34:58] Is there a podcast I recommend, I'm going to say the entrepreneur lifestyle.

[00:35:01] Cause obviously that's command amazing fun. I'll put the link 

[00:35:04] Sam Kamani: [00:35:04] to that in the description. sure. 

[00:35:06] Ben Ivey: [00:35:06] But the other ones, I was recently on a podcast, it was on a podcast yesterday called discover your talents. I thought that was very interesting, speaking to different people about their career and their journey and how they have built themselves up.

[00:35:21] I think that was fascinating. I was on, Oh, my health was a fascinating one as well. It's about hope and about in life when we are facing challenges, how can we really move forward in a way where there is that hope from what is that story of hope? And I guess those two are the ones that off the top of my head, because I've done them recently that I think would be incredibly helpful for the lesson.

[00:35:45] Yep. 

[00:35:45] Sam Kamani: [00:35:45] That's great. Second last question. And that is if you had unlimited day money and resources, what would you build or what would you do? 

[00:35:57] Ben Ivey: [00:35:57] That is such a good question. Cause I ask that in a lot of my seminars and I'm the way that I phrase it is if you had all the time in the world, all the money and you couldn't fail.

[00:36:09] What would you do? And for me, I'd be doing exactly what I'm doing right now. And I think that's really the. Golden star or the aim that we all have is to do what we want to do. If those limits one that cause very often I see them as those limiting beliefs, That the ties the money and whether or not we believe we can do it.

[00:36:31] So for me, it's counting on this journey and I couldn't be more grateful for where I am and the impact that I'm having and the impact that I will have in the future. It 

[00:36:39] Sam Kamani: [00:36:39] is amazing to see that you have the opportunity and you are doing, or you have seized that opportunity to follow that path and be able to do what you want to do, and have that sort of satisfaction.

[00:36:55] That is amazing. That's really positive to see. Finally, how do people connect with you and reach out to you if they have any questions? 

[00:37:04] Ben Ivey: [00:37:04] Sure. So everyone connect with me home, my website. So then-ivy.com. I V E Y mother plant. huh. They can have me on social media. We chat span ID and I'm more than happy to have a conversation connect and to see how I can help you on your journey.

[00:37:21] Sam Kamani: [00:37:21] That's fantastic. I will put all the links in the description as always wherever this video and audio goes. Okay. Thank you so much, Ben, for your time. it is really has been eye opening and I'm sure it will help lots and lots of founders who are in entrepreneurs, who are going through tough times, who are struggling mentally and emotionally to get that resilience to do, Just to get that to hear from you.

[00:37:48] So that'd be amazing. Thank you once again for your 

[00:37:51] Ben Ivey: [00:37:51] time. Gotcha. Thank you for having me and remember for all the entrepreneurs out there. You're not alone. 

[00:37:56]