Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani

26: Connecting founders with resources they need to succeed - Ashley Martis

October 17, 2020 Sam Kamani, Ashley Martis
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
26: Connecting founders with resources they need to succeed - Ashley Martis
Chapters
Want Money Got Money with Sam Kamani
26: Connecting founders with resources they need to succeed - Ashley Martis
Oct 17, 2020
Sam Kamani, Ashley Martis

On this episode I discuss with Ashley his entrepreneurship journey, travelling to over 50 + countries and 250 + cities. 

Ashley has launched multiple successful startups and worked alongside multiple founders and entrepreneurs. 

He shares all his lessons he learnt from becoming an entrepreneur at a very early age. 

Ashley Rahul Martis ~MrMartis~ is an avid entrepreneur and networker. He has travelled across the world from Toronto, to New York, London, Kuwait, Banglore, San Francisco and many more.

Ash is the founder of StartupFuel, the ultimate global startup platform: with all the resources and connections to help your startup succeed, StartupFuel is the ultimate small business partner. StartupFuel has now 1000+ businesses registered from 250+ cities in 50+ countries and growing fast.

Here are few other things that we discuss on the podcast

  • Value of networking and how to do it effectively
  • How to try things in sprints
  • How to navigate a tech ecosystem
  • How to deal with the uncertainties of entrepreneurship

Book recommendation:-

Decoding Silicon Valley - Jonathan C. 

Hooked - https://www.amazon.com/Hooked-How-Build-Habit-Forming-Products-ebook/dp/B00LMGLXTS 

Podcast recommendation:-

20 min VC

Connect with Ashley:-

https://www.linkedin.com/in/martis/

Ashley’s email is in the audio. 

https://twitter.com/MrMartis

https://www.startupfuel.com 

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

Follow instagram:- https://www.instagram.com/wantmoneygotmoney/

Show Notes Transcript

On this episode I discuss with Ashley his entrepreneurship journey, travelling to over 50 + countries and 250 + cities. 

Ashley has launched multiple successful startups and worked alongside multiple founders and entrepreneurs. 

He shares all his lessons he learnt from becoming an entrepreneur at a very early age. 

Ashley Rahul Martis ~MrMartis~ is an avid entrepreneur and networker. He has travelled across the world from Toronto, to New York, London, Kuwait, Banglore, San Francisco and many more.

Ash is the founder of StartupFuel, the ultimate global startup platform: with all the resources and connections to help your startup succeed, StartupFuel is the ultimate small business partner. StartupFuel has now 1000+ businesses registered from 250+ cities in 50+ countries and growing fast.

Here are few other things that we discuss on the podcast

  • Value of networking and how to do it effectively
  • How to try things in sprints
  • How to navigate a tech ecosystem
  • How to deal with the uncertainties of entrepreneurship

Book recommendation:-

Decoding Silicon Valley - Jonathan C. 

Hooked - https://www.amazon.com/Hooked-How-Build-Habit-Forming-Products-ebook/dp/B00LMGLXTS 

Podcast recommendation:-

20 min VC

Connect with Ashley:-

https://www.linkedin.com/in/martis/

Ashley’s email is in the audio. 

https://twitter.com/MrMartis

https://www.startupfuel.com 

If you enjoyed this episode then please subscribe, I will be interviewing other successful founders and investors to provide you a shortcut to success.

Follow instagram:- https://www.instagram.com/wantmoneygotmoney/

Ashley Martis: [00:00:00] Entrepreneurs successful people understand that this is again, not, not a, even though I say work in sprints, the entire entrepreneurial cycle is a marathon.

[00:00:08] It's not a sprint. You can do small tests in sprints, but the journey and your self development is a marathon. It takes time. That's why like a lot of successful people. you'll see that they meditate a lot. They exercise the eat well because you're trying to set yourself up in the best way possible where everything else is consistent.

[00:00:26] Cause this thing won't be. This thing will not be, it's an unforgiving lifestyle.  as long as your mental health is yeah. In order, and you can understand that it may not work today and there's going to be high someday where you're ecstatic and things are going super well and your team, and everything's good.

[00:00:42] And it's other days you're like, How do I even pay myself? How do I even put food on the table? Right. And understanding that, you know what not about the peaks and the troughs, it's about making sure that you are, you stay consistent through all the highs and lows is how entrepreneurs in the end get to success.

[00:00:58]Sam Kamani: [00:00:58] Hello, dreamers and action takers. Welcome to another episode of the one money got money podcast. I'm your host, Sam Kamani. And my today's guest is Ashley Martis. Now Ashley is a CVL intrepreneur and an amazingly effective networker. He has managed to make connections all around the world. And today he's going to share. 

[00:01:23] His intrepreneurship journey. What has worked for him, what mistakes he has learned from and how to be an effective networker.

[00:01:32]Currently he's working on a startup called startup fuel where he aims to connect founders and entrepreneurs like you globally. With the resources you need to be successful so let's hear from him more about it

[00:01:47]ashley, you did the show. It's great to have you here. I've been waiting to talk with you. Um, I have heard, and 

[00:01:54] Ashley Martis: [00:01:54] I've read so much about startup field wanting to know 

[00:01:57] Sam Kamani: [00:01:57] everything about it.

[00:01:59] tell us a bit about what you're up to these days. 

[00:02:02] Ashley Martis: [00:02:02] Yeah. So start a fuel is a, is a brand new LinkedIn type platform for the startup ecosystem, connecting founders and corporations, accelerators mentors, um, from everywhere. I think, you know, one of the biggest problems that we're trying to solve is the lack of organization of this ecosystem.

[00:02:19] I mean, it's exploded ever since the, you know, the first days the Stanford president back in, uh, you know, in, uh, in the Valley invested in his two PhD students to create the first automated vacuum cleaner, um, which, which a lot of people have claimed as the, one of the birth of the entire Valley and the tech movement from the, yeah.

[00:02:37] It snowballed got bigger and bigger. Yeah. Exits, uh, universities got involved. So from that point on, it's just. It exploded all around the world. I mean, from, from California to, uh, places in Israel where they start using military, uh, to, to help fund the technology, boom. Now it's in every country, in every city and every little nook there's technology everywhere.

[00:02:59] Right. But nobody has taken the time to actually. Index everything organize the entire space and put like labels and, um, kind of tags to everything. So we took it on herself. How are, how is someone supposed to navigate this ecosystem when nobody has organized the ecosystem? Right. So that's kind of what we do at sort of fuel is try to build a, building a platform to make the equitable distribution of resources for entrepreneurs and helping people connect them.

[00:03:27] If they don't even have access to it. 

[00:03:29] That's excellent. so , 

[00:03:31] Sam Kamani: [00:03:31] your niche 

[00:03:32] Ashley Martis: [00:03:32] would be around startups and 

[00:03:34] Sam Kamani: [00:03:34] entrepreneurs compared to LinkedIn, which is about everything from HR to pretty much consulting to any sort of, um, business. It could be hardware, it could be software, but you're focusing on the startup niche, you would say.

[00:03:51] Ashley Martis: [00:03:51] Yeah, exactly. I mean, like there's so much. Boom that's happening in the world and the world of startups. And I'm sure everybody in around the world knows the word startup has become, has gotten a lot of popularity in the last little while. Right. So yeah, we wanted to focus in one area. I mean, the dream one day is to become a small business platform.

[00:04:11] Where anybody who wants to open up their first company and to grow it comes here, finds the resources, the, you know, the, the lawyers, the accountants, everybody needed to get their company off the ground. But today we don't want to go too big, too fast. And so our focus is let's, let's focus on the startup industry.

[00:04:27] Let's focus on this niche. There's a very. Systematic model, um, from early stage venture going to accelerate programs, angel networks, venture capital funding, uh, corporate ventures and exits it's. There's somewhat of a strap structure. So it's easy to start here and then expand to other small businesses.

[00:04:47] Sam Kamani: [00:04:47] No, that's great. 

[00:04:48] Ashley Martis: [00:04:48] How did you get 

[00:04:49] Sam Kamani: [00:04:49] interested in startups and entrepreneurship? 

[00:04:53] Ashley Martis: [00:04:53] Yeah. So, you know, I went to, I went to business school and, um, you know, a school called Schulich up here in Canada and Toronto, pretty well known and established a reputable school. Um, going into school. I always wanted to do accounting.

[00:05:05] I even took some accounting courses in high school. Um, but when, when I entered the program, I actually a friend of mine and his older brother had started a small textbook rental company, um, by the name of book fly. And it was a really, really cool startup, um, expanded and grew. And I really got, um, you know, really well versed with him about how things are going even came on, helped advise him a little bit, um, help with, um, uh, really on a.

[00:05:33] Part time basis with some of the books, with my accounting background. Um, and then as the company grew, they exited the company. And as part of that, part of the exit, I was realizing, this is such a cool industry. You can go in and create new innovations, disrupt the, with the status quo and change the way things are done.

[00:05:49] So while I was working in corporate, I worked in, in banking. I worked in, in marketing and consulting all the time in the evenings. I wanted to run, start a company. So I did that. I had like my nine to five jobs as an intern. And then from six to 11, I had a offices in the city where I'd go and work and build something.

[00:06:05] Cool. So I've been involved in so many different hackathons and competitions and things like that, that I just like started to understand that this is the future of the business world. It's a real disruption using technology to change what everyone thought is just the way things should go and make something new, make something that is more fair for everybody else and distributes the kind of wealth the from, from the 1% down to two more equitable sources.

[00:06:34] Sam Kamani: [00:06:34] Yep. Makes sense. And just looking at 

[00:06:38] Ashley Martis: [00:06:38] your 

[00:06:40] Sam Kamani: [00:06:40] LinkedIn profile and just looking at your online social profile, 

[00:06:43] Ashley Martis: [00:06:43] it seems like you have 

[00:06:45] Sam Kamani: [00:06:45] been to a lot of places and you've done a lots of interesting things from mentoring to meeting people. Um, what are some of those sort of things that you've been involved in?

[00:06:57] Ashley Martis: [00:06:57] Yeah. So I, I'm a, I'm a big believer in the power of your network. Right? Um, I actually got connected when I was younger to a, um, a very, very successful business entrepreneur here in Canada, uh, by the name of Harry Rosen who actually owns and operates a men's retail, where, and I had met him at a conference, he was a keynote speaker.

[00:07:16] I went up to him. I was like, I'm 18 years old, hustling entrepreneur. I'd love to learn about, you know, get some advice from you. I impressed him. And he invited me to his office and took me under his wing as my mentor. Um, I went there a couple of times and the number one thing he taught me was, you know, it's not about what, you know, in this world, it's about who, you know, it's literally about your network and how well you can manage and organize those relationships.

[00:07:38] So from that day on, I set my own personal goal to do about one to two networking events, almost religiously for them, for the foreseeable future. That was about nine years ago, nine and a half years ago. Um, I'm now 760. You know, roughly around events, deep in around 30 cities around the world. Um, I love going to talking to people.

[00:07:59] Some people. Read books. Some people digest information by going to classes and doing things. Me, the, my entire learnings come from people. I go around. I talk to a lot of people and especially because the startup space, the innovation space are filled with passionate people who love what they're doing and are trying to change the way their industry works.

[00:08:18] So when you talk to them about what's going on, they know they're the forefront. Of what everything's changing. So you get to absorb information and learn. So for me, going to all these places, um, I initially started going around Toronto and then started going to the U S going to New York and California then started venturing out to Europe, Asia, and other places in the middle East.

[00:08:39] And at that point in time, I started learning that. Startups is actually not just a North American or not, not just a, you know, a Southern Cal kind of initiative, but it's exploding everywhere. So what is really needed is a way for us to, you know, communicate and connect people. And that's how my entire, um, business and everything started when I was in Los Angeles.

[00:09:01] Um, many, many years ago, uh, visit a buddy of mine who was living out there and he's like, come and come and stay with me. And, uh, it was, it was awesome. I went in, you know, I'm out in LA and we got to go to that. One events went to this really cool event called angel hack, which is a hackathon that happens.

[00:09:19] I think, I believe don't quote me on this, but I believe it was in the independence day tower. So in the movie independence day, there's a tower in LA. So it was really cool. We went there to that event and I got to meet one angel network that was like, Hey, um, you know what, California is getting saturated.

[00:09:34] In terms of how much it cost of living and things like that. And they're not a massive angel natural green angel fund. They want to invest in the East coast of the U S they want to invest all the parts of the world, but they didn't have the capabilities to do it. So, so they asked me if they could, if I could recommend some companies that I'm meeting in my travels, And that's how it all began.

[00:09:52] I recommended a few companies, they invested in, one of them wrote me a check for a marketing fee and kind of like said, you know what? This is a really cool way. Cause we really need to find companies that are part of our thesis. Can you? It was fine. That, and that's how we got, you know, that's the beginning of how we got here today.

[00:10:11] Sam Kamani: [00:10:11] That is excellent. So did you do that sort of a service for angel networks, VC funds under a brand name, or was it just under your name just informally or how did it all work? 

[00:10:23] Ashley Martis: [00:10:23] Yeah. Initially it was just connecting people. Um, you know, myself, I didn't even know it was a, it was a business. It was just like, Hey, I know somebody here, let me make an intro.

[00:10:31] And then over time, what happened was that it became like the startup companies started approaching us and saying, you know, we want to make pitch decks. We want to make business plans and we want to make, uh, financials and the investors in the side side, we also want to. Find good companies and assess them.

[00:10:44] And like when, when I studied in school, I studied, uh, with the specialization of entrepreneurship and finance and a little bit of venture capital. So I also became a kind of evaluation expert. I put, uh, I started valuing early stage ventures. I put together this really cool Excel model that takes into account all the stuff we learned in, in finance of the public markets.

[00:11:03] What, how do I value like a stock? In the, on the other stock exchange. And then I started understanding how to VCs do it. So using like a venture capital scorecard method and exit scenario, and I said, why don't we put together like a big model that actually incorporates all these different. Models with different weights based on stages and industries.

[00:11:23] And I did that and I started selling it to small investors and small angel networks to be like, Hey, we can be a third party due diligence for you. Right. So that's kind of how it initially began to slowly startups started coming to me and saying, we want to make, we want to help. You know, maybe you'd help me as they pitch decks to make all these things and present to investors in the inkling.

[00:11:43] That's how it all began. That's great. 

[00:11:46] Sam Kamani: [00:11:46] Um, so much, so much to unpack there, everything from the start off your, of, of your hustle and going to over 700 events and over 30 cities around the world and all that to how you are helping startups. 

[00:12:02] Ashley Martis: [00:12:02] Um, But 

[00:12:05] Sam Kamani: [00:12:05] that idea, their startup to investors. Um, there's so many things, 

[00:12:09] Ashley Martis: [00:12:09] but one question I have is like, 

[00:12:11] Sam Kamani: [00:12:11] um, you know, when you, you have met so many founders and entrepreneurs in the last five to 10 years, and what is the one common theme that you have seen that successful founders or entrepreneurs do compared to the, the not so successful ones?

[00:12:31] Ashley Martis: [00:12:31] So I think a lot of it, um, the successful entrepreneurs is a lot of it persistence and understand consistent validation with customers like com completely having like an obsession in solving the problem to the point where they're always thinking about it. And always trying to find ways to try different methodologies to solve it.

[00:12:48] You're not going to get it right the first time. Most, most companies don't and most founders. I mean, unless you're really lucky, you're the first venture that you start will be a successful one. Um, you're going to go through failure. You're going to go through times when you're realizing that the business doesn't make sense, it might be a different market timing.

[00:13:05] Maybe when you started the company, uh, what you were thinking of was good. But then as you started getting more information, you started realizing maybe there's already something out there. Maybe there's something different enough about what you're doing and then consistently changing and pivoting until something makes sense.

[00:13:20] And you have satisfied customers is what I'm noticing. So even I got, I got to a chance to meet some of the, um, really cool companies like Shopify that, uh, you know, was initially it's from Canada. That initially started out, I got to meet they're early founders at an early stage, and I got to watch all these people that were successful in what they did to become successful, because there are a bunch of people who didn't.

[00:13:42] Who were the same trajectories thing. And I think, you know, like I said, a lot to do was iteration was consistent iteration about what what's right. What's working, doubling down on that and what's not working kind of cutting it out and focus it and like, you know, almost cutting their losses in those areas.

[00:13:59] Right. Yeah. So really, really, really, yeah. I would say customer centric model is what success is really based on. 

[00:14:08] Sam Kamani: [00:14:08] That is super useful for any founder that's listening. 

[00:14:14] Ashley Martis: [00:14:14] The other question I have is like, you know, um, a lot of my audience of people I'm connected 

[00:14:19] Sam Kamani: [00:14:19] with and listen to this or follow on social media and all that, 

[00:14:23] Ashley Martis: [00:14:23] they are all very 

[00:14:24] Sam Kamani: [00:14:24] early stage founders.

[00:14:26] Um, some of them, 

[00:14:27] Ashley Martis: [00:14:27] they just have 

[00:14:28] Sam Kamani: [00:14:28] like a minimum viable product. Some of them have like a few handful of. Customers clients, um, how do you even start valuing something like that, then you don't have a massive track record and you have just started say six months ago, a year ago, something like that. You don't have three years financial data too.

[00:14:50] I dunno to evaluate a company in the traditional. 

[00:14:53] Ashley Martis: [00:14:53] Yeah. So, I mean like at the end business is all about revenue, right? Like money coming in. At some point, it doesn't have to be today. It's gotta be at somewhat some companies, they start out and they have a product to sell. That's ready to sell today. You know, service funds can sell their service or, you know, tomorrow, uh, versus some products might take some development of the product are built, but in reality, at some point in time, there is something that needs that can be sold.

[00:15:19] Right. And understanding, you know, if you, if everything went right from now until then one customer who was purchasing your product, what is that price? They could be paying for it. Right. What is that potential price and what are other competitors in the space we're paying that same thing. What are they paying right now?

[00:15:35] And how could you, you basically compare it. So from that point on when you have one customer who's paying, you can then work backwards from there. Yeah, but you can say there's always a funnel that comes into place when you know, you're not gonna get you get every single customer you target will actually convert to a paying user.

[00:15:52] There'll be a percentage. And at certain points it drops off. So if you walk, work backwards from that one point and say, okay, in the industry, One sale is equal to $10,000. All is worth of lifetime value like the company or that person, or the consumer will purchase it X amount of times. Um, and you work backwards to the, to the starting point.

[00:16:12] You realize that, okay, to get this one customer, we're going to have to drop off many people along the way. So other other industries, other companies in the same industry like us may have, like, let's say a 5% conversion from the people they're targeting today to that end goal. So, if you, as a business, have a strategy to build in customer acquisition and say, this is how much it costs for us to bring companies in, you know, how many people you can target at the top end of your funnel.

[00:16:39] You'll know. So if you starting off with X amount of money or some kind of outreach, you'll know that's how you're going to start. And then you also know based on those industry standard conversions, what the value of that, that customer will be in yet. So using that method, you know, the value of how much a lifetime value of a customer is.

[00:16:57] And when you work backwards, the number of mailing lists people, the number of people in your neck to work, whatever it is, it starts becoming the valuation of the business. And again, it's very complicated. It's not as easy as this, but this is an example of something of a way to start thinking of how to value a business.

[00:17:14] What is the end customer and what is the path needed to take him to get there? And what do we need to do today to start building a re an iterative process to improve the funnel 

[00:17:24] Sam Kamani: [00:17:24] that is, is super, super valuable. So pretty much, um, could you say it it's like, um, the CAC to LTV ratio would be the key thing.

[00:17:35] Ashley Martis: [00:17:35] You can't say that because industry is, you know, you can't say that because every industry is different, right? Certain industries, maybe that would make sense for certain industries. It doesn't right. So like, but in a, in a broad sense, it's a good measure to understand that as long as you can, um, bring in customers and acquire them for cheaper than their lifetime value, you know, that there's a viable business model, right.

[00:18:02] Sometimes it has to do with deal with the volume. Right? Sometimes it has to deal with a crazy amount of volume. So even like the likes of like Netflix, Right for them, like it paying six 99 or nine 99 a month is a very small price. Right. And that number would we take a really long time to monetize and actually make a significant amount of money.

[00:18:23] But because of the internet, we are, we are now allowed, um, to reach mass volumes of people. We're allowed to, we can reach up to like, you know, huge, huge volumes that were not possible before. So if you can bake into your model saying, look at the early stage, we're going to be investing a lot of money into the product and the development.

[00:18:42] But at some point in time, all of those things are going to convert at small pieces of revenue or even large piece of revenue. At the end of the day, the volume will carry and it will weigh the cost. That's what, that's what I kind of define as a startup company versus a normal company. Absolutely. At some point in time, the marginal cost of every single new customer is exponentially decreasing.

[00:19:07] Right. And the revenue is still going up. So every single new customer, because most of the technology and the stuff has already been built before right now, every new customer doesn't require a lot of costs. Maybe data, maybe storage, maybe there is some cost associated. Right. But. Having that exponential difference between revenue, uh, the number for revenue and the cost associated with that and increasing over time is what a startup is different from a regular business.

[00:19:37] Sam Kamani: [00:19:37] That is really, really good. Um, I need to make a clip of this for, for anyone, you know, thinking about, um, valuing or, um, finding a value for their, for their startup of, or what they can pitch it at. Um, so looking back 

[00:19:56] Ashley Martis: [00:19:56] of your 

[00:19:57] Sam Kamani: [00:19:57] nine years or 10 years that you've been, you've been doing this, if you had an advice for your younger self, um, Think of like HD was just starting out.

[00:20:07] What would that 

[00:20:07] Ashley Martis: [00:20:07] advice be? How I think, like I said before, like being able to do that re iterative process, which I also learned over time, you know, and being able to cut things out that didn't make sense or try, try, try things in sprints. So try things out with a clear cut goal. Like if I'm trying a new method, let me give it X amount of time for it to work.

[00:20:29] Let me determine what. A success point is like, if we hit this number of, of a metric, it is successful. Anything less than that, it's not successful and saying, what do I need to do before I start this sprint to make sure that I can have set myself up in the best way to get there and test it out. I think when you take a very systematic approach to entrepreneurship, what you end up doing is you're ended up de-risking everything you do.

[00:20:54] Rather than adding on and trying to figure it out. But sometimes honestly, like I wouldn't, I don't regret anything. And I think that a part of the process, when you, when you have different companies and you're building out yourself is you learn different aspects of a business that you never knew before.

[00:21:08] You know, payroll things like, you know, applying for tax or making sure the company is situated in the right area and the right environment, uh, trying new tools every time you have a new venture or anything, you learn something new that you didn't know before. So this entrepreneurship is an lifelong journey.

[00:21:25] It's not a one time thing that you'll there and sometimes you may get successful because things worked out yeah. And luck plays a huge, huge, huge factor. Right. But things don't get discouraged. Entrepreneurs successful people understand that this is again, not, not a, even though I say work in sprints, the entire entrepreneurial cycle is a marathon.

[00:21:45] It's not a sprint. You can do small tests in sprints, but the journey and your self development is a marathon. It takes time. That's why like a lot of successful people. They, you know, you'll, you'll see that they meditate a lot. They exercise the eat well because you're trying to set yourself up in the best way possible where everything else is consistent.

[00:22:04] Cause this thing won't be. This thing will not be, it's an unforgiving lifestyle. And so, yeah, as long as your mental health is yeah. In order, and you can understand that it may not work today and there's going to be high someday where you're ecstatic and things are going super well and your team, and everything's good.

[00:22:21] And it's other days you're like, How do I even pay myself? How do I even put food on the table? Right. And understanding that, you know what not about the peaks and the troughs, it's about making sure that you are, you stay consistent through all the highs and lows is how entrepreneurs in the end get to success.

[00:22:38] Sam Kamani: [00:22:38] That is so, so true. I cannot agree more. And I do really like that analogy that he gave that, you know, it is, it is a marathon, but from, 

[00:22:48] Ashley Martis: [00:22:48] for me how I 

[00:22:49] Sam Kamani: [00:22:49] feel it as like it's a marathon of lots of small sprints along the way. 

[00:22:55] Ashley Martis: [00:22:55] Exactly. Yeah. 

[00:22:57] You 

[00:22:57] Sam Kamani: [00:22:57] have to just keep consistent. And I've seen that even from the best startups, the best content creators, the best YouTube channels, the one thing everyone has in common is that they are consistent.

[00:23:09] They keep doing what they are doing over and over. And, and as you said, Looking after your mental health, physical health relationships, all that help you, um, in the long run because smart people like you understand that this is not a six month thing. This is a lifelong journey entrepreneurship. That is so, so that is great.

[00:23:33] Um, before we go, I have this, um, three sort of quick questions. Um, what was. Um, the last book you read, or what's a book that you are reading right 

[00:23:43] Ashley Martis: [00:23:43] now. So, um, there's a book called decoding Silicon Valley, which I'm reading and it's very much, it's very important for me because of the ecosystem that we're building.

[00:23:54] It was written by a man named Jonathan bear. Who's a grandfather of the Silicon Valley. Like I met him in the Valley. He's had multiple funds himself. Um, and. The entire book talks about how to navigate a tech ecosystem. And it's specifically for this. So it's Silicon Valley, but it applies to any current tech businesses today.

[00:24:13] How do you build use relationships to leverage connections and get to certain milestones? Right. I really liked that guy. And I think that any, any tech entrepreneur, I think very, um, you know, it's not an Inn right. Recommended in many places, but I honestly would recommend anybody to take a look at that.

[00:24:30] Um, obviously you, you have the standards of the lean methodology, lean startup and all those other, other books itself. But this one, I think, you know, aside from the generic ones is a really cool one. And one more I'd also suggest is the book called hooked. Another very good book that talks about how, how we, as how we, um, attract consumers today with a certain, you know, trigger how they make an investment based on the trigger, how they get rewarded and then re trigger them to come back in the flow.

[00:24:59] It's a really cool concept and it doesn't just apply to startups. It applies to many different types of businesses. It's just a really smart framework about thinking about. How to give value to customers first and then ask them to do something for you in return. 

[00:25:14] Sam Kamani: [00:25:14] Can I ask you a quick question about the book decoding Silicon Valley, and you talked about leveraging networks, leveraging your connections, and I see you as someone who has done this extremely well.

[00:25:26] So how do you. In your view, leverage connections are leverage your network the best. 

[00:25:33] Ashley Martis: [00:25:33] I'm still learning. I'm not even an expert at this. I'm like I have lots of connections. And for the longest time I was building up the connections. Now I'm looking to like actually start utilizing it and something that is very, um, Underrated is a personal CRM.

[00:25:50] Everybody in a, in a business world, especially CEOs and founders should look to invest and try to find a personal CRM. Whether it's you find a Salesforce use Zoho, you use like some tools, whatever it is, or even if you've set up like a Trello board or something and use that as a CRM. Being able to keep track of contacts and have regular followups with the people that you are.

[00:26:12] Um, you know, most you, you, you find not only our instance, but also your appreciate what the work they've done and give them that, that credibility. And that acknowledgement is really important. Cause you know, in a world full of distractions, There's a lot of people you'll meet. Like I said, I met 40,000 people and some of the people I've met, I don't even remember still.

[00:26:30] And I wish I started on day one to do this where I started putting them into a CRM. Seeing when was the last time I chatted with them. When's the last time I emailed them. So that, and an index items, tags, who, who are they? What did they do? What did, what did they want? You know, how can I help them? Right.

[00:26:45] Once you understand that you started helping other people. That's what I did a lot of in the beginning, I was just, I made connections and introductions without asking for anything in return. It was just like, Oh, you need a marketing agency. I just met one at a conference a couple of weeks ago. Let me make an intro.

[00:26:58] And over time when people, they become very appreciative of you. Yeah. They're like, Oh, thank you so much. How can I, what can I do to help you? And like that, you know, honestly, helping people is a, is a big purpose of human life. I think I believe happiness is helping other people. The more you can help others.

[00:27:17] Right? And it's not enough for selfish intent, not to like to get held back or anything, but the more people you help, the more lives you impact in a good way. And we only have a limited time on this planet anyways. Right. We only have 80 90 years if that, if that's out there to live. So like once you're, once you pass away and you're, you're, you know, you're gone from this world, have you left a legacy and have you helped people?

[00:27:39] It doesn't have to be, you see where you are, a billionaire or a millionaire or whatever. Yeah. Kind of that kind of stuff, legacy. But even if you've helped one person with their life and, and improve their, make their life better. You can at least go to bed or go to a rest, knowing that at least one person's life was improved because of something I did.

[00:27:59] And if I wasn't here that wouldn't have happened. That helps so much with your, um, it comes back to customer centric focus when I was talking about in terms of success, because if you think of customers as, as people and friends and family that you want to help out and you want to make their lives easier, everything else has comes naturally.

[00:28:16] Sam Kamani: [00:28:16] Yep. A hundred percent. I will share with you what I do. Um, On the postal CRM site. So just as you said, I have, 

[00:28:25] Ashley Martis: [00:28:25] hello, 

[00:28:26] Sam Kamani: [00:28:26] I'm a jello boat 

[00:28:27] Ashley Martis: [00:28:27] four. So I do a bit of 

[00:28:29] Sam Kamani: [00:28:29] podcasting. So I have a Trello board where I have all the podcast 

[00:28:32] Ashley Martis: [00:28:32] guests and all the podcast hosts 

[00:28:34] Sam Kamani: [00:28:34] and anyone I meet. And then after later on I go and then I connect them.

[00:28:39] And I do it just for free because I like connecting people. And then sometimes when those connections do business that they do together, um, I get happy out of it because I get messages that, Hey, thank you for introducing me to, so, and so it helped me. And then I've got another Trello board for investors looking to invest in startups.

[00:28:58] And I've got a Trello board of startups looking for funding. And then if they are in the same niche or 

[00:29:03] Ashley Martis: [00:29:03] industry, I connect them. 

[00:29:05] Sam Kamani: [00:29:05] So I've got multiple Trello boats, but you know what? This. It makes me think that there is a huge need for a personal CRM, and that is going to be massive in, in future as the leverage or connections and people understand the value of social connections.

[00:29:21] Um, so, so yeah, I cannot agree more. So if someone listening and who has time on their hands, they should go and build a personal CRM for, for individual human beings. 

[00:29:33] Ashley Martis: [00:29:33] Yeah, I've actually, I've seen a couple of them now that are, yeah. A couple of minutes. I don't know, off the top of my head, any of them I'll have to research and I can probably share that with you and your network, but I've seen a couple of them that have come out.

[00:29:46] Um, you know, LinkedIn is a. It's a professional CRM, right? It's a personal CRM for your professional network. Facebook is like a, it's like a CRM, right? If you think about it, I like being able to, uh, you know, actually actively go and do something with the, with the people is very underrated. You know, like going out and even just messaging somebody say, I have no reason to message you.

[00:30:08] I have no, I have no intent. Just, I just want to thank you for having been part of my life and, you know, having, um, coming across, you have no idea, the power that people feel when they get a message like that. It's like, wait, what? Like, there's no reason for this. Like, why is, why is the person thanking me?

[00:30:23] And immediately it sparks a conversation to be like, okay, this person. Just cares about, about wellbeing. And, and obviously you don't do that just to everybody you do that to people that you care about, or you have a you're inspired by, right? Yes, absolutely. If you're, if you're, if you're an entrepreneur, if you're somebody listening, why don't you take the time, write an email and send it to five people, just five people that you don't talk to, but I've inspired you and to say, Hey, I'm.

[00:30:49] I'm not, um, you know, I have no reason to send this, but you know what you've done, your work, whatever has, has really inspired me and me really push on my journey. So thank you so much and keep doing, you just do that. We'll see what power and positive response that brings. And you know, you, maybe you can, you can report back to me like emails.

[00:31:07] I should start to feel that calm and just let me know how that went. I love to share everyone's experience on that. 

[00:31:13] Sam Kamani: [00:31:13] Look, I'm going to do that and I will report back and I've even my age journey and make a video and post it on LinkedIn and in Stein everywhere on, on that. Thank you. Thank you for that suggestion and recommendation.

[00:31:28] We'll definitely follow second question of these three ones. 

[00:31:31] Ashley Martis: [00:31:31] Is 

[00:31:32] Sam Kamani: [00:31:32] that, um, is there a podcast that you listen to, or do you recommend. 

[00:31:37]Ashley Martis: [00:31:37] the 20 minute BC. Yeah. I actually have that as a top. One of my top ones.  20 minute VCs and other really good podcasts on Spotify.

[00:31:42] I listen to, um, if you haven't heard of it, that's another good one has some good insights on the market, how it's changing, how the VC, how VCs really want to, you know, look at companies and as a startup, as a startup founder, Really really cool place to go. I will check that out as well. 

[00:31:58] Sam Kamani: [00:31:58] And the last question is if you had unlimited time, resources and money, what would you build or what would you work on?

[00:32:06] Ashley Martis: [00:32:06] If I had unlimited time, resources and money, I would ex I would, um, build a. International space exploration company, to be able to take humanity into space. And that's kind of what something I keep under wraps on under like very low key, but one day that's my dream is to turn everything that I'm doing into a way to unite all the innovators on the planet for one purpose so that we can all start like getting, becoming an interplanetary species and start, you know, living on different.

[00:32:35] You know, living in the moon and getting a thing on Mars. I think either our generation end of our generation or the next couple of generations will start really harnessing the power of our, you know, our solar systems. And I'd love to love to be able to start that before my time is up on this planet.

[00:32:54] Yeah. It, 

[00:32:54] Sam Kamani: [00:32:54] it, it will happen. I'm, I'm pretty sure about that. That we will eventually become an interplanetary species. It's just time it's just when it happens, it's just, yeah. But then it happens in the next 15 years, 20 years or 50 years or 80 years. 

[00:33:11] Ashley Martis: [00:33:11] That's yeah. So, yep. 

[00:33:14] Sam Kamani: [00:33:14] Well, I 

[00:33:14] Ashley Martis: [00:33:14] really appreciate the work of like people like Elon Musk, that what they do with space X, I had a chance in LA to go out to their check out what they're up to.

[00:33:21] It's it's honestly, The, the reusable rockets was, is a very, but it's a smart way to start very, very smart. And next to the combination of the electric electric technology coming out of Tesla with SpaceX and NASA, you know, newest technologies, I think is the. The pioneer into that, but that's just the travel from here to there.

[00:33:43] There's a whole set of problems in space that we have to get to, to deal. And they're going to be needing entrepreneurs all over the globe who are coming up with ideas and solutions to get us, to tell people to live and operate. So, you know, there's still so much innovation yet to come and the startup movement is just beginning it's I call it the revolution.

[00:34:03] Sometimes we use this phrase that started fuel that we're fueling the startup revolution because it's just begun last 20, 30 years. And there's still another hundreds of hundreds of years ago for how it's gonna explode. Yeah, 

[00:34:15] Sam Kamani: [00:34:15] couldn't agree more. Um, and finally, do you have ask, are you looking for customers, investors, team?

[00:34:21] What are you looking for? 

[00:34:23] Ashley Martis: [00:34:23] Yeah. So, um, uh, right now we're looking at, you know, companies to come on on the platform, startup companies, we're trying to help connect them to various resources. So even if pitch competitions, accelerator programs, venture capital funds, government grants, corporate innovation come and list your opportunity here.

[00:34:38] The network is growing and people will be able to find you. And likewise, the startup companies come and list your profiles. We are building a platform for the people that it's, it's built by founders. For founders, the purpose is to help people reduce the failure rate from 90% down to 40. So definitely come, come in.

[00:34:55] Um, and everyday we're trying new things using data networks to help people become successful, help people write back to the same, uh, the concept we're talking about. Um, but yeah, um, That's the thing. We are also in the middle of our, uh, around, uh, raising capital. And we're looking for investors from all over the world, um, and trying to build a good syndicate of, of different funds investing in big data.

[00:35:17] Um, so if anybody is an investor out there or knows some from some funds that would be really interested in building a global entrepreneurial network to unite the innovators of the world, come chat with me. 

[00:35:29] Sam Kamani: [00:35:29] Fantastic. I will put all your links under in the description and, or on the screen, if it is going out on a video.

[00:35:37] So thank you, Ashley so much for your time. It was a pleasure talking, um, yeah. All the best for all your future ventures. 

[00:35:46] Ashley Martis: [00:35:46] Yeah. Thank you so much, Sam. And thank you for doing this. These podcasts are amazing. Um, you know, and I'd love to share with my network as well. That's great. 

[00:35:53]Sam Kamani: [00:35:53] You so much for listening to this episode of one money, got money with Sam Kamani, hope you enjoyed the show and got some valuable insights that would help you in your startup or your business. Yes. If you haven't already please subscribe and rate the show on your favorite platform, it would be excellent, extremely helpful.

[00:36:13] And I just cannot tell you how much I would appreciate that.